Colette Cassinelli's visionary use of information literacy and educational technology

Tag: mobile learning

NCCE 2015 conference sessions

NCCE 2015 conference sessions

Next week I will be presenting at NCCE 2015 … Wednesday 2hr workshop – Extend Learning using Online Discussion Forums Extend learning by using online discussion forums with middle and high schools students.  Provide opportunities for your students to demonstrate their understanding of concept presented in class, […]

Digital Learning Day

Digital Learning Day

    Digital Learning Day – Friday, March 13th – happened to fall during our school theme week this year.  With already a ton of extra scheduled events to explore social justice issues around water, I wanted to find a simple but fun way to […]

ISTE 2015 – Unleash the Power of Your iPad with “App Smashing”

ISTE 2015 – Unleash the Power of Your iPad with “App Smashing”

Join me at #ISTE2015 and come play and learn the power of App Smashing, the process of using multiple apps in conjunction with one another to complete a new and creative final task or project. We’ll put together fun combinations of apps to use with middle and high school formative assessments, presentations and student work.

Pre-registration required. Register now! Seats are still available.
[Explore and Create : BYOD]
Wednesday, July 1, 1:15–2:15 pm

Purpose & objective

The purpose of this session is to provide participants with a hands-on session where they can extend the power of their iPad or mobile device to improve student learning – specifically geared towards middle and high school students. Participants will learn about and explore various iPads apps and learn how “smash” the apps together to form a new product. Workflow solutions will be share as well as suggestions for managing classroom activities.

ISTE 2015

Essential Questions:

How does using mobile devices encourage creativity and collaboration?
How can I encourage problem-solving by “thinking outside the box” and brainstorming solutions?
How can I combine free apps to create a new and unique product?
How can I plan workflow routines that keep students focused on learning and not just on doing?
How can my student showcase their creations for authentic audiences?

Participants will demonstrate success by documenting their app smashing product and sharing during the public showcase.

Outline

1. Introduction / Goals
2. App Smashing defined – kudos to Greg Kulowiec for the term.
3. App Smashing showcase – share real examples gathered from classrooms.
Basic Example: Camera roll + Photo/Strip Designer + Thinklink/Explain Everything = Interactive photos with narrations and links.
4. App Smashing workflow tips: Begin with the end in mind, brainstorm apps that will be smashed, decide smashing workflow. storage and transfer, and then create the final product and decide how it can be shared.
5. Let the Smashing Begin! Workshop members will create project for their subject area.

Step One: Create products from apps that can be “smashed” using: the camera roll, photo editing apps, comic strip apps, simple presentation apps, simple video apps — which then … Step Two: Can be combined with more sophisticated apps that allow embedding, annotations, narrations or sharing/publishing to a wider audience.

6. Academic App Smashing: combining apps to improve and produce a smoother and seamless academic workflow. Example: Schoology + Notability + Google Drive apps = assignments that have annotations which then can be shared with small groups.
7. Share final products using a Gallery Showcase.
8. Questions / Evaluations

Supporting research

App Smashing – Unleasing Creativity by Greg Kulowiec https://docs.google.com/a/edtechteacher.org/presentation/d/137B8alwc-L8OdXAIxOkN28IuZzBlIViJTxTpR9f_fX4/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000#slide=id.p

App Smash Creations – http://edtechteacher.org/unleashing-creativity-greg-kulowiec-app-smashing-from-beth-holland/

App Synergy – http://www.techchef4u.com/history/app-synergy-the-art-form-of-app-smashing/

The Definitive App Smashing Guide – http://www.mguhlin.org/2013/07/the-definitive-app-smashing-guide-no-of.html

Mobile Learning Parent Meeting

Mobile Learning Parent Meeting

An essential part to rolling out any 1:1 mobile learning initiative is to get your parent community involved and provide opportunities to educate parents and answer any questions or concerns.  At La Salle Prep we put together a parent information night last Spring to present […]

iPad Online Modules – 6

iPad Online Modules – 6

5. School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy At La Salle we want to be clear about our expectations with or without technology.  Below are some typical school scenarios and the related rules from the Acceptable Use Policy.  If you haven’t downloaded and read the Acceptable Use […]

iPad Online Modules – 5

iPad Online Modules – 5

3. Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time

Using the iPad for Learning

schoologyThe iPad is a great device for communicating, collaborating, and interacting with a variety of educational resources. Teachers will post class materials and resources on their Schoology page that you can access with the Schoology app.  You will download and access most of your textbooks on your iPad and use apps for instruction and review.   You will have 24/7 access to databases and eBooks and conduct Internet research whenever you need information. On the iPad you can create presentations to demonstrate your learning, type your papers, watch videos to learn new concepts and so much more.

Acceptable Use during Instructional Time

instructionalTo maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during class time.  Teachers will direct you when it is appropriate to use your iPad and when they want you to put it away.

We understand that it will be tempting to want to check your email, access social networks, or even play games when you have an iPad at your fingertips all the time. Our job at La Salle is to help you understand when that is appropriate and when you need to focus on academics.

Teachers or administrators may:

  1. Ask you to close apps that are not needed in class.
  2. Spot check to make sure you are using the appropriate resources.
  3. View or control your website usage using Teacher View.
  4. Limit the use of the camera, social networks, games, videos, email, etc.
  5. Ask all students to put their devices away.

According to the AUP, students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member. Even though you own your device, you do not have the right to display apps, music, movies, games or images that violate school policies while you are at school or attending school events.

“Academic Mode”

iPads are often used for recreational purposes, but in a 1:1 environment or when studying at home, it’s necessary to avoid the potential for distraction and focus on whatever task is at hand. Try to have a new mindset that iPads are treated as tools for learning, and not just devices for entertainment.

Challenge yourself to be fully present in class, during lunch and when doing homework. Avoid the temptation to go online, check your Facebook status or message your friends. Determine set times when you are going to access social networks.

Students should place their iPads in “Academic Mode” when they come into class or when completing homework. Academic Mode means:

  • Only needed academic files and applications are open or visible on your iPad.  Avoid having distracting applications visible while working on schoolwork.  This includes any non-academic applications, websites or notifications such as:  social media, messaging, games, news or email.
  • Turn off sounds and disable notifications or alerts.

To help yourself avoid distractions, temporarily turn off Wi-Fi when working with local files like textbooks, writing a paper or creating a presentation.  Be in charge of your online usage.

Next:  Be Respectful To Community Members

4. Be Respectful to Community Members

With 24/7 access, some students might use technology in inappropriate ways. Online cruelty, also referred to as cyberbullying, takes place whenever someone uses digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone else, often repeatedly.  People post things online that they wouldn’t say in person.

In this video from Common Sense Media, a teenage boy discusses the prevalence of saying hurtful things online and the impact those comments had on a particular friend.

http://youtu.be/YvpcWAZJzoY 

Is Ricardo is a cyberbully? He said he was just joking around. Ricardo is probably considered a cyberbully because he openly criticizes people online. On the other hand, we do not know how mean his comments were, and if he might change his behavior in the future. One of the issues with cyberbullying is the scale and the fact that it is public. Information generally travels faster and reaches more people on the Internet than offline, and this fact may make the impact harsher.

Ricardo thinks that harassing others on Internet, rather than in person, appeals to some teenagers because they can’t be attacked back physically.  People may cyberbully online because they do not have to face their target and can “hide” behind their computers. On the other hand, conflicts that start online often go offline at some point.

Have you ever encountered online cruelty? How do you think someone might feel after being the target of it?

Targets of online cruelty may feel they can be bombarded with negative comments at any time, anywhere. And when more offenders join in the online cruelty, the situation gets even worse. Watch this video and place yourself in Stacey’s shoes.

http://youtu.be/w4ugP_eQUR8

Who was involved in the story and what roles did they play?

  • Target: Stacey, whose intentions are misunderstood and who feels beaten down by being picked on offline and online
  • Offenders: The girl who misunderstood Stacey’s intent, as well as her friends who led the cruel online behavior
  • Bystanders: All of the people who might have stepped in but did not, including Stacey’s cousin and others at school or online
  • Upstander: Stacey’s mom, who empathized with Stacey and encouraged her to seek help from the school

As Stacey says, most of the comments were made anonymously and from “miles away.” It may be easier for offenders to be cruel when they are not face to face with their target. It’s easy for online cruelty to spread quickly, both because of the technology and because of the herd mentality.

Targets and Upstanders Can De-escalate Online Cruelty

You can make a difference — even if you are being targeted.  Here are a few ideas:

Targets:

  • Ignore and block the bully. Offenders often want attention. Take it away and they may give up.
  • Save the evidence. You may need it later for documentation.
  • Change your privacy settings. Allow only people you trust to see or comment on your pages.
  • Tell trusted friends and adults. Create a support network.

Don’t just ignore cyberbullying if you see it happening at La Salle.  Be an Upstander!

Upstanders:

  • Stand up to the offender when appropriate. If you see something negative, say something. Make it clear that you think online cruelty is wrong, and tell the offender to back off. (It may be easier to do this if you have good standing with the offender.)
  • Point out the bully’s motivation to the target. Comfort the target by explaining that many offenders act cruelly just to gain control, power, or status.
  • Help the target advocate. Help the target find friends and school leaders who can help de-escalate the situation. It’s easier to stand up to cruelty when you are not alone.

Bystanders may hesitate to get involved in a cyberbullying situation because they don’t want to become targets themselves. Put yourself in the target’s shoes. What would it feel like if nobody wanted to help you out when you needed it most? You can show support in many ways, even simply by listening to a target about his or her experience.

Next: School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

iPad Online  Modules – 4

iPad Online Modules – 4

MODULE 2: ACCEPTABLE USE 1. Introduction: Acceptable Use Policy The mobile learning program at La Salle provides tools and resources for a 21st century education, empowering you to maximize your potential in preparation for college and the workplace. Using iPads offers an opportunity for you […]

iPad Online Modules – 3

iPad Online Modules – 3

3.  Quiz: Student Responsibilities 1 Students are required to have a protective case for their iPad.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties · 2 Students must bring their iPads to school each day ….Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties · 3 Where is a good place to store your iPad during […]

iPad Online Modules – 2

iPad Online Modules – 2

Taking Care of Your Mobile Device

Be Preparedbprepared

Being a good digital citizen and a responsible member of the La Salle Prep community means students come to school prepared to learn. Students must take good care of their iPads and bring them to school each day:

  • In good working condition.
  • In a protected case that meets the school’s requirements.
  • With sufficient storage available for school use.
  • With the appropriate apps and textbooks installed.
  • With the battery fully charged.

Be Carefulbecareful

It is expected that students will care for their iPad during use and transportation.  Students need to take ownership for his/her own digital property and should treat and use their iPads responsibly and appropriately.

  • Use an iPad case that covers the corners.
  • Clean your iPad with a soft cloth or consider using a screen protector.
  • Do not place heavy objects on the screen.
  • Store your iPad in a padded backpack or neoprene sleeve. Do not toss your backpack on the ground.
  • Avoid getting your iPad wet or leaving it in a hot car.

Be Securebesecure

La Salle Catholic College Preparatory takes no responsibility for stolen, lost or damaged iPads, including lost or corrupted data on the devices.  While school employees will help studentsidentify how to keep iPads secure, students will have the final responsibility for securing their personal iPad. This equipment is the personal property of the student/parent and is subject to inspection in accordance with the Acceptable Use Policy if found or confiscated.

  • Engrave your contact information on your iPad.  Label accessories with your name.
  • Lock your iPad in your locker when not using it.  Keep your locker locked.
  • Do not leave your iPad charging in an unsecure area.
  • Install the Find My iPad app on your device.
  • Keep your passcode private and do not lend your device to friends.
  • Backup up your data to a computer or iCloud.
  • Report your lost or stolen iPad to the school office immediately.

Members of The Tech Nest (La Salle’s student-run tech support group) created this video to remind you about some important tips for caring for your iPad.

http://youtu.be/vII4yg2P3iA 

Next:  Check your understanding with a Responsibility Quiz

iPad Online Modules – 1

iPad Online Modules – 1

For our mobile learning 1:1 program rollout, we are asking our students to go through a series of online modules using Schoology to review digital citizenship and our Acceptable Use policy, guidelines for setting up their iPads, which apps to install, care and use of […]

Embracing Mobile Devices

Embracing Mobile Devices

The Common Core State Standards call for students to develop digital media and technology skills. One way to help them reach that goal: incorporate gadgets they’re already familiar with — cell phones, tablets, and smartphones — into their learning environment. There are, understandably, some concerns […]

Learning plan with 1:1 technology

Learning plan with 1:1 technology

iPadA team of teachers and administrators at my school identified eight areas where we feel that mobile devices could really impact student learning.  This is not an exhaustive list but represents how we need to really look beyond the iPad as a  consumer device and look for opportunities for content-creation, authentic learning experiences and collaborative projects.
Increase efficiency

  • Students have 24/7 access to Library databases & ebooks with Access My Library, Destiny Quest and Follett Digital Reader app.  Accessing these resources right when student’s need the information promotes the “flow of learning” and reliability on credible sources.
  • Students have access to productivity apps to use right when they need them for note taking, writing papers, completing science labs, etc.  The apps include:  word processing (Pages), spreadsheets, presentation (Keynote) and annotation apps (and more).
  • The built in camera gives immediate access for students to take photos and movies and edit it with the same device.  This streamlined process is much more efficient and easier than using desktop software and eliminate scheduling issues in the computer lab.
  • Having eTextbooks on devices means that students don’t need to purchase separate books for each subject area and will have the resources they need 24/7.

Increase student engagement

  • Use Socrative or Nearpod to engage students will polls or teacher-led or student-paced quizzes
  • Using enhance eBooks – like E. O. Wilson’s Life on Earth – that contain audio & video can engage students with multimedia elements to further their understanding of the content material
  • Students can gather, create or digitally manipulate images to demonstrate their understanding of a concept learned.  The learning can be even deeper if audio recordings accompany these digital images (SonicPics).  Audio recordings could be language practice, persuasive speeches, debates, poetry readings, etc.

Improve speed and quality of feedback to students

  • Record student giving speech/presentation with camera.  Open in iMovie and orally record feedback soundtrack on top of movie.  Publish and upload to share with student
  • Teachers can use iAnnotate to give feedback to students on written drafts.
  • Share resources, assignments and images through iTunes U or Google Drive.

Scaffolds learning for students

  • Use ExplainEverything, ShowMe or EduCreations to record an explanation for a student.  The screencast will record voice, diagrams and written text.
  • Students use Inspiration Maps to brainstorm ideas for writing and project planning, or provide a visual representation of learning.
  • Students can use a virtual dissection app before conducting a science lab in class.  This can provide students with an interactive environment to learn concepts being presented and alleviate concern and stress during the activity.

Promotes discourse focused on critical thinking and problem solving

  • Using Book Creator, students (or teachers) can create eBooks that demonstrate their understanding of learning targets.  These eBooks can contain text, audio, images and embedded video and can easily be shared as a PDF or uploaded to iTunesU.
  • Use authentic data to create graphs and charts to support a hypothesis or thesis in Numbers.
  • Use interactive tools of Algebra Touch to interact, manipulate or create math problems for deeper understanding.

Engages students in metacognition / reflection

  • VoiceThread provides an asynchronous threaded discussion around images or documents.  Students can leave comments by text, audio or webcam or it can be used for personal reflection about projects, art, participation, etc.
  • iAnnotate gives students the ability to annotate iBooks, pdfs and written documents with their personal reflections.

Helps students meet / exceed standards

  • Apps can provide review for material presented in class such as Algebra Touch, Hello Hello World (languages), Library of Congress Docs Teach, etc..
  • Students can use math or science virtual simulation apps to help their understanding of concepts that are difficult to “see” or understand.
  • Students can access free online courses through iTunes U or review videos from Khan Academy, TED, or Discovery Channel.

Engages students in application-based authentic learning

  • Using Skype or Facetime to communicate with guest speakers or experts in the field.
  • Use camera and video features to document service learning projects. Upload them to La Salle YouTube channel.
  • Access news and information in real-time as current events are happening.
  • Create their own textbook for use in class.

What would you add to our list?