Colette Cassinelli's visionary use of information literacy and educational technology

Tag: Google Docs

Great Features of Google Docs

Great Features of Google Docs

With Google Docs, you can create and edit text documents right in your web browser—no special software is required. Even better, multiple people can work on the document at the same time and every change is saved automatically.  If you are new to Google Docs […]

Google Apps training material

Google Apps training material

I often am asked to come to a school and provide a basic Google Apps for Education (GAFE) training during a faculty meeting.  Below is the sequence and activities that I use for a 2 hour training.  Feel free to use or adapt as needed. […]

Schoology Workflow on the iPad with Notability and Google Docs

Schoology Workflow on the iPad with Notability and Google Docs

A video to showcase how teachers at La Salle Prep are using Schoology with their students, including integration with Notability and Google Drive.

Schoology Workflow video – watch on YouTube

Using features of Google Search & the new Research Panel in Docs

Using features of Google Search & the new Research Panel in Docs

I’ve started creating some simple screencasts of different ways you can effectively use Google search and Google Apps for Education for teachers and librarians.  This first video showcases the “preview panel” in the Search results panel as well as filtering the results using the sidebar […]

Join our 40-day blogging challenge

Join our 40-day blogging challenge

My 8th grade students are participating in a 40-day blog challenge.  Each day two different students post an idea on our Tread Lightly blog of how to be a good steward of the environment by recycling,  reducing emissions, using less packaging, planting trees, etc.  Our […]

Change Our World for the Better – A Letter to the Next President

Change Our World for the Better – A Letter to the Next President

The Journalism class at my school participated in the Letters to the Next President writing project sponsored by Google and the National Writing Project.  Below is the submission by our assistant editor:

We want to have our voice heard.  Here at our [school] in Beaverton, Oregon, more than 75% of our student body was not able to vote in your election this November.  But we still have strong opinions on important issues of the day and about where our country and our whole world is going.  We want to help you change our country for the better and thus, change our world for the better. Although we could not help to choose our new president, we can still share or views so that you can keep teenagers in mind, as well as registered voters, during your presidency. We are the future and we will be voting in the next election, but we want our voice to be heard today as well as in four years.
 
From a poll conducted in some of Mr. T. Manning’s government class, some strong opinions on key issues of the day were voiced.  Many students cited the war in Iraq and the environment as topics that needed the most focus.  One government student stated that we need “to take care of the environment or it won’t be there for our children or grandchildren.”  “The economy, which is in such a bad condition right now, is interrelated (with) many other issues, such as energy and oil and the war (in Iraq).” The student who voiced this opinion also stated that she was strongly against the Iraq War and saw health care as a top priority. 
 
In a class of mostly fifteen- and sixteen-year-olds, the topic of energy and oil came up a lot more than you would expect from a pre-driving group.  One of the students said that she felt that it is really important for our country’s survival to become energy independent.  Many of the students also ask you to “focus on developing and improving alternate energy sources” to help stop our dependency on oil.  A couple of the students talked about the benefits of drilling in Alaska to remove our dependency on oil from foreign countries, but also one student wants “the long-term effects of offshore drilling and the harnessing of geothermal power* to be thoroughly considered.”  The student goes on to state that “medical advances might be hindered through the destruction of resources which have potentials (that are) not fully understood yet.”  Many other students cite the environment as an important issue; they ask you to protect the earth and save resources.  One student went on to say that “the environment should be saved, but not to the point where businesses can’t even open” because the land is being protected. 

Other issues mentioned briefly were same-sex marriage, tax breaks and health care.  One student asks for a “mandate to all people” regarding health care.  Another student states that “same-sex marriage should be allowed.  (Marriage is) a person’s choice, not society’s.”  The majority of the government students are against same-sex marriage, but it was not an overwhelming majority; many students said that marriage and sexual orientation are life choices not to be controlled by the government.  Many of the students said they were for tax breaks “to strengthen the economy,” but some were against such breaks.   The issue that was most strongly talked about was the war in Iraq.  The majority of the students were against the war, citing the enormous cost of the war as one of their main reasons for opposition.  Some ask you to pull the troops out or to at least not send anymore, but two students feel that we need to finish what we started.  One stated that “the Iraqi people cannot be left behind unless we know that there is a stable government (in Iraq),” while the other pro-war student insists that “if we pull troops now, we will have a bigger mess than we did to begin with.”

 So in conclusion, we hope that you keep our opinions and the opinions of other under 18-year-olds in mind during all your days in office.  We are considered to be too young to make a good decision while voting, but as you can see, we have our country and the whole world’s best interests at heart.  We would like to congratulate you on your amazing accomplishment, but also remind you of something you are probably told all the time: you have just accepted the job of either leading our country out of our “funk” or further into the dark.  We congratulate you and put our country in your hands and just ask you to keep us in your heart and mind.

Thank you for your consideration,

Katie M, Valiant Pride Assistant Editor

 *Geothermal power “is energy generated by heat stored in the earth, or the collection of absorbed heat derived from underground, in the atmosphere and oceans.”

—Wikipedia.com

Tech Tip Tuesday – Teaching Revision & Google Templates

Tech Tip Tuesday – Teaching Revision & Google Templates

By MaryFran Lynch Revision Last week we introduced you to Google Docs and gave you some ideas of times you might want to use the text feature to collaborate with your colleagues and times you might like to have your students use it. This week, […]

Tech Tip Tuesday – Intro to Google Docs

Tech Tip Tuesday – Intro to Google Docs

Google’s focus will always be providing high quality search results but many of their other products have revolutionized how individuals share information and collaborate on documents. This week’s tip is to introduce you to Google Docs & Spreadsheets.  Google Docs makes creating, editing and sharing […]

Featured in Google Docs for Education blog

Featured in Google Docs for Education blog

Last month Google Docs sent out a request to educators to share how they use Google Docs in Education.  Selected entries are showcased on their blog and mine was chosen!!!  Here’s what i submitted:

In my attempt to avoid sitting through days and days of PowerPoint presentations in my high school computer classes (and boring the students in the process), I decided to upload each of my students Online Safety PowerPoint’s to a Google account and the class joined the presentation. One student talked aloud while everyone listened and chatted about the presentation.  The students asked questions in the chat, added their own information and followed along in the presentation.

For the first time I can EVER remember as a teacher – 100% of the students were engaged in the presentation and participated in the chat.  The students were enthusiastic and offered insightful and appropriate comments.  The students liked being able to add their input without interrupting the presentation.  I will definitely use Google shared presentations again.

I love Google Docs and use them all the time in my classroom.  Here are a few other ideas:

  • Editing stories written by newspaper staff
  • Collecting addresses for mail merge
  • Surveys
  • Collaborative group planning for projects
  • Collecting real time data (science experiment, calorie counting, etc)

Check out how other Educators are using Google Docs here!

Top Ten Tools 2008

Top Ten Tools 2008

Colette’s (updated) Top 10 Tools Gmail. I love this web based email system and the fact that I can access it from any computer. Not only do you get tons of storage but I like the way it keeps the threaded conversations together. Gmail chat […]