Tech integration curriculum ideas

Curriculum ideas for Technology Integration

based on National Technology Standards for Students

Creativity and Innovation:Demonstrate creative thinking and problem solving skills to develop innovative products and processes using digital technology
  • Recording personal memoirs w/ images in iMovie or Photostory
  • Create a website using Wix or Google Site to compare World Religions & embed information, videos, images into a Google maps
  • Use primary source images from Library of Congress to create digital timeline
  • Design a radio program, practice reading poetry or language conversations using VoiceThread, Garageband or Audacity
  • Use Prezi as an alternative to PowerPoint
  • Create a collaborative art presentation and share images through Flickr
Communication and Collaboration: Use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, across the global community, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
  • Have a collaborative writing project using a shared Google document or use it for shared note taking w/ Evernote
  • Use Survey Monkey or a Google form to collect authentic data and then graph the result in Excel
  • Skype with an expert instead of bringing in a speaker
  • Collaborate with another school using a blog to discuss a topic like current events, environmental issues or service learning
  • Participate in a global asynchronous debate where each team records their arguments and then posts them online
  • Set up accts with iGoogle or social bookmarking sites (Delicious or Diigo) for students to share websites and online post-it-notes with each other
  • Brainstorm science concepts or pre-writing activities with Wallwisher or Inspiration
  • Set up microblogging with just your students using Edmodo
  • Set up groups with student’s email for document sharing, project directions and to foster communication
Research and Information Fluency: Select and apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, validate, and use information.
  • Follow inquiry method for authentic research and avoid “bird units”
  • Compare and contrast results from database searches or look for websites that show bias
  • Use specialty search features like wonder wheel, timeline or creative commons search
  • Set up accts with iGoogle or social bookmarking sites (Delicious or Diigo) for students to share websites and online post-it-notes with each other
  • Subscribe to current event or science blogs with RSS for research
  • Set up a collaborative research project with another LaSallian school and collect and share data
  • Have students create a screencast on how to solve an equation with screen capture software or use real photos/movies to determine math equations
Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making: Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.
  • Collect data about an authentic issue (ie, solar panels & alternative energy) & use data to influence decision making with blog, debate or PSA
  • Use models and simulations to modify data for best results
  • Write formal business letter to Congress or Representatives
  • Use a wiki or shared document to manage group projects, write collaborative science labs or present together
  • Look at discussion forum of Wikipedia to see debate of content
  • Use Google Maps or Earth to discuss and analyze how geography affects migration, population, border issues, etc.
  • Use games or online simulations for role playing, decision making
Digital Citizenship: Understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to digital technology and practice legal, ethical, and responsible behavior.
  • Model digital citizenship skills with a Moodle discussion forum or blog
  • Debate cyberbullying issues or write editorials
  • Create lessons for younger students about online safety and publish as a website, blog or movie
Technology Operations and Concepts: Utilize technology concepts and tools to learn. Select, use, and troubleshoot tools efficiently; Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies. Teach specific computer skills:

  • Word: MLA format, brochure, using Outline view, track changes, letter format
  • PowerPoint:  basic formatting, use speaker notes, action buttons, improving visual design, embedding sound & video, packaging for publishing
  • Excel:  setting up data, writing formula, graphing results
  • Google Apps: setting up accts, document sharing, shared folders, collaboration techniques

Tech Tip Tuesday: Google Earth curriculum ideas

by MaryFran Lynch
http://sites.google.com/site/techtipstuesday/googleearth

Google Earth can be wonderful to use to introduce your students to the places in their text books. You may want to create your own lessons or use some that have been made available to compliment your lessons. Here are a few you may be interested in:

Language Arts

Whether your class is reading,  Possum Magic by Mem Fox, By the Great Horn Spoon by Sid Fleishman, or The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, Google Lit Trips can take your students to the setting of the book and make the story come more alive with the pictures and resources available in the placemarkers.

Older students will enjoy seeing the places in Shakespeare’s Plays,   Jane Austen’s Life and Work, or John’s Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley. These sites are found in the Google Earth Community along with numerous other resources.

Social Studies

Also found in the Google Earth Community is a map showing the westward explorations of Lewis and Clark.  The placemarkers take you to the lewis-clark.org website for more information.

See the California Missions Alta California and in  Baja California by exploring these sites.

Find out about the Crisis in Darfur or track the US Unemployment Rates at the Google Earth Outreach website. Look here for other Google Earth files from community and environmental action groups.

See what Ancient Rome looked like in 3-D. Walk down the streets of Rome in 320 AD and explore the insides of ancient buildings, all recreated in Google SketchUp.

Math

Here are some places to check out for using Google Earth in math

Science

Can you think of a better tool to teach geological map interpretation? Here is great lesson from On the Cutting Edge to help you get started.

Study the effect of Global Warming with this lesson from David R. Wetzel.

Just for Fun

  • Send a GeoGreeting . Have your message spelled out with buildings found in GoogleEarth.

There is so much available for Google Earth, and more resources being posted all the time. All it takes to implement these ideas is a free downloaded version of Google Earth 5.0 , and your lessons can take you (and your students) places.