Co-Creation & Ideation Tools

Co-creation and ideation tools facilitate the most direct interaction between team members on the goals or desired outcomes of the project. Using these tools, participants can often work in groups directly editing or building the project artifact.  Several of these tools are the same ones used for project management – which is great – because the students will already be familiar with the interface.

Google Apps for Education A group of students can work together on an in Google Docs and Spreadsheets, seeing changes in real time and even discuss the process or comment right within the tool.  Everything is automatically saved in the cloud which means that documents, presentations and sites can be accessed – and edited – on almost any mobile device, computer or tablet.

Group members can edit documents, presentations or websites with images, videos, tables, drawings, or links and teachers or other students can give feedback by adding comments. The discussion feature (now available in Spreadsheet and Presentations as well as Docs) allows team members to talk about the project, what to do, how its going, etc right within the project.  You can even use the Research tool right within Documents to search for content on the web. Google Sites can be used as a portfolio or as a place to embed and showcase student projects. As a teacher you can create a template of a Site that contains directions, examples, links to resources and helpful tips and then have your students make a copy of the site.   This productivity suite was made for collaboration!  Other collaboration suites are:  Zoho Docs  and Microsoft 365.

Google Apps Examples:

  • Spanish students worked collaboratively to create a newspaper with a variety of articles: “LA PRENSA DE LAS PANTERAS”
  • Students use a Google form to collect data about the relationship between your height and wingspan to prove or disprove Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man”
  • Students researched Biomes and various projects were embedded into a Google Site

WikispacesWikispaces: A wiki is a website which allows its users to add, modify, or delete its content via a web browser.  On a wiki students can share work and ideas, pictures and links, videos and media.  A wiki can be made public so anyone can edit the space or limited to just a class or a few participants.  Many different types of projects can be embedded in a wiki so they work well for showcasing projects made with other tools like:  videos, documents, polls, calendars, maps and specific Web 2.0 tools where you can get the HTML embed code (example:  Google Presentations, VoiceThread). Wikispaces provides free wikis for teachers and they do not contain ads. Don’t forget the tips for collaborative projects using Wikispaces. Another wiki option is PBWorks.

Wiki Examples:

  • High School online collaborative writing wiki
  • Elementary students in Auckland, New Zealand are using part of their class wiki as a blog and the other half to showcase student-created projects.
  • wiki to showcase student-made math movies

 

Evernote is a great tool for students and teachers to capture notes, save research, collaborate on projects, snap photos of whiteboards, record audio and more. Everything you add to your account is automatically synced and made available on all the computers, phones and tablets you use.  Notebooks can then be shared with group members and accessed from anywhere.

Evernote Examples:

  • Elementary grade students use Evernote for student portfolios
  • Here is a blog post how a Librarian uses Evernote as a research tool.

 

MeetingWords is a very simple text editor for the web. Your text is saved on the web, and more than one person can edit the same document at the same time. Everybody’s changes are instantly reflected on all screens.  You can work together on notes, brainstorming sessions, homework, etc.

Other content creation options:

VoiceThread:  A VoiceThread is a collaborative, multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos and allows people to navigate slides and leave comments in 5 ways – using voice through a Facebook Fan Page (with a mic or telephone), text, audio file, or video (via a webcam). Share a VoiceThread with friends, students, and colleagues for them to record comments too. Users can doodle while commenting, use multiple identities, and pick which comments are shown through moderation. VoiceThreads can even be embedded to show and receive comments on other websites and exported to MP3 players or DVDs to play as archival movies. (https://voicethread.com/about/features/)  Here is a wiki with VoiceThread examples: http://voicethread4education.wikispaces.com/


Prezi:
  Prezi is a virtual whiteboard that transforms presentations where images and words work together to present an idea or lesson.  You can work together on the same prezi in real-time. With Prezi Meeting, teams can collaborate live or simply present prezis with up to 10 people in a prezi at one time. Prezi Meeting is included in all license types.

 


 

Ideation

Ideation is the process of generating, developing, and communicating new ideas.  There are several technology tools that support this brainstorming process.

Mindmeister:  You can work with multiple users simultaneously on the same mind map. All collaborators will be shown in the map footer if they are working on the same mind map. You can turn on the History View to see what changes have been done by which users. You can share your mind maps with a single collaborator, group, or public.  You can give presentations directly from MindMeister either online to other collaborators or with a projector.

Popplet:  Popplet is a place to collect ideas.  Its very simple to use easy great for younger kids.  You can collect inspiration, record thoughts, explore ideas, create galleries. Popplets share be shared and collaborated in real time.

Padlet:  (formerly called Wallwisher) is a super easy way to collect ideas, images, and multimedia onto a simple “wall”.  Works great on tablets too.

Other mind-mapping tools: Webspiration Classroom and Creately (paid)


Creative Commons / Copyfriendly Images/Audio/Music

Discuss with students how we can honor intellectual property by searching the web for “copyfriendly” images to use for collaborative projects.  Help students to understand that all of their work – whether digital or not – is copyrighted the minute they create it. You do not need a © symbol to copyright your work.  You created it – you own it!

I like to appeal to the creative musicians, photographers and artists in my classes.  I try to help students understand that they can CHOOSE to share their creations and still maintain ownership.  This leads to a discussion about Creative Commons licensing.  If a student is willing to share their work to be remixed, changed or altered they must decided whether to allow commercial use or not.  Going through the process of choosing a license for their own work reinforces the concept of “honoring” the intentions of the other content-creators.

Inevitably, a student brings up the concept of “fair use” and wonders why they can’t just so a Google image search for their school-related assignments.  Its at this point that we talk about the purpose of citations for school work – that citing an image for a PowerPoint or presentation means that you are not taking credit for having made the image used and are indicating on the Works Cited page who is the original owner.

This discussion helps students to understand that under fair use laws, teachers must still follow certain rules:

  • I will include a notice that the materials are protected by copyright
  • I will use technology that reasonably limits the students’ ability to retain or further distribute the materials
  • I will make the materials available to the students only for a period of time that is relevant to the context of a class session.

Sure, there are always going to be those who think that if its on the Internet then they should be able to use it. But presenting Copyright vs. Creative Commons in a way that explains WHY and focus on HONORING the work of others, gets kids thinking about themselves as content-creators and how they would feel if someone “stole” their work and made money off it.

My all-time favorite resource to share with students is Joyce Valenza’s CopyFriendly Resource Page.

Honoring intellectual property

I have been spending this past week discussing how we can honor intellectual property with my students as we search the web for “copyfriendly” images to use for multimedia projects.  Helping students to understand that all of their work – whether digital or not – is copyrighted the minute they create it is a new concept for a lot of kids.  I explain that you do not need a © symbol to copyright your work.  You created it – you own it!  Many are under the impression that you need to apply for a copyright symbol – showing their confusion with a trademark.

Appealing to the creative musicians, photographers and artists in the class, I try to help students understand that they can CHOOSE to share their creations and still maintain ownership.  This leads to a discussion about Creative Commons licensing.  If a student is willing to share their work to be remixed, changed or altered they must decided whether to allow commercial use or not.  Going through the process of choosing a license for their own work reinforces the concept of “honoring” the intentions of the other content-creators.

Inevitably, a student brings up the concept of “fair use” and wonders why they can’t just so a Google image search for their school-related assignments.  Its at this point that we talk about the purpose of citations for school work – that citing an image for a PowerPoint or presentation means that you are not taking credit for having made the image used and are indicating on the Works Cited page who is the original owner.  Luckily I teach at a school where citing using MLA or APA is used by a variety of teachers.

This discussion helps students to understand that under fair use laws, teachers must still follow certain rules:

  • I will include a notice that the materials are protected by copyright
  • I will use technology that reasonably limits the students’ ability to retain or further distribute the materials
  • I will make the materials available to the students only for a period of time that is relevant to the context of a class session  (see more)

I try to help my students to understand that even though using a copyrighted image for in-class presentation (with citation) is allowed under fair use – a lot of what we are doing in Multimedia / Web Development will not allow us to follow these guidelines because we plan on displaying them in a public forum by remixing images and making cool banners for our websites.  And you know what – the kids get it. Sure, there are always going to be those who think that if its on the Internet then they should be able to use it. But presenting Copyright vs. Creative Commons in a way that explains WHY and focus on HONORING the work of others, gets kids thinking about themselves as content-creations and how they would feel if someone “stole” their work and made money off it.

Most of my students tell me they want to share their work so I encourage them to apply an CC license for their creations – but also encourage them to retain ownership and ask for attribution.  And I know my students are understanding the bigger picture when they ask me if we are going to be sharing a particular assignment online – or is OK to “just” cite a copyrighted image for an in-class assignment — or where they should link attribution for an image they found on Flickr.

I am thankful to teacher librarians like Joyce Valenza who has put together an incredible listing of places to find “copyfriendly” images and audio online at:  http://copyrightfriendly.wikispaces.com/

AASL Best 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning

AASL’s 25 Best Sites for Teaching and Learning was posted last Fall but I never had a chance to blog about it.  It contains links to a huge variety of resources for both teachers and librarians.  Some of my favorite tools like Jing, Prezi, and the fabulous FREE webinar from Learn Central made the list and a few others that I have heard of before but haven’t had the chance to use with students – like MuseumBox and Storybird.

Here are three that I feel are important for teacher librarians:

Live Binders
Live Binders are a great way for Librarians to quickly share a series of website to share with students or teachers.  You make a binder with websites, images, documents, a PowerPoint and movies.   You can make binders private or public.  If you want to share a private binder you give people an access key.  A new feature is that you can now collaborate on LiveBinders.   I love the idea of a students  creating a PowerPoint or uploading an essay and  then including the sites of where they got their information.  Use the Present button to view your LiveBinder like a PowerPoint.    Here is the link to my sample project I made for a Religion teacher: http://livebinders.com/play/present?id=61731

Creative Commons
I think it is essential to teach students about Creative Commons licensing if we want our students to honor intellectual property.  Giving our students opportunities to be content-creators helps them value the works of artists, photographers, musicians, etc.  Explain to a student when they create something they immediately own the copyright to that creation.  They do not need to have a © to protect their creation.  Students can choose to apply a Creative Commons license to their work if they choose.  Students can choose whether to allow commercial use of their work, allow modifications and require attribution (credit).  Here is an example of a Creative Commons license:
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States License.  Another aspect of CC is requiring students to find images that have a CC license so they do not violate copyright.  Joyce Valenza has a great wiki with all kinds of resources at:  http://copyrightfriendly.wikispaces.com/

National Science Digital Library
I had the opportunity to attend a workshop given by the NSDL.  What an incredible resource!  The NSDL is the National Science Foundation’s online library of resources and collections for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and research.  Think of it as a search engine for all things science.  The NSDL collects resources from various organizations and evaluates them before allowing them to be part of their collection.  Every Librarian and STEM teacher should know about it.  Plus, the NSDL offers workshops, seminars, and presentations to teach you how to use their digital resources.

Learning at NCCE08

It’s great to see the good people of Seattle have so much wisdom to share with tech-loving educators this year. I have already been to several excellent sessions:

Karen Fasimpaur – Free Content + Open Tools + Massive Collaboration = Learning For All

 

Karen discussed the Open Educational Resource (OER) movement. She first addressed copyright and the creative commons licensing (www.creativecommons.org). She shared several open source tools that I was already familiar with, like: (MediaWiki, WordPress, Moodle, Open Office, The Open CD, GIMP, Audacity, and CamStudio).

The focus of her presentation, though, was on open CONTENT that can be used for educational purposes. She gave permission for all of us to share her resources so here I go:


Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

Open Licenses You Can Use

Creative Commons – www.creativecommons.org

(The CC BY-SA or CC BY are recommended licenses for education.)

GFDL – www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html

Tools

MediaWiki (wikis) – www.mediawiki.org

WordPress (blogs) – www.wordpress.org

www.wordpress.com will host your blog as well.

Moodle (course management) – www.moodle.org

OpenOffice (productivity) – www.openoffice.org

The Open CD (various) – www.theopencd.org

GIMP (image editing) – www.gimp.org

Audacity (sound editing) – http://audacity.sourceforge.net

CamStudio (screen recording) – www.camstudio.org

Content

Freely Usable Audio Content*

ccMixter – www.ccmixter.org

Wikimedia Commons music – http://commons.wikimedia.org

Spoken Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Spoken_articles

The Freesound Project – http://freesound.iua.upf.edu/

Common Content www.commoncontent.org

Internet Archive – www.archive.org/details/audio

Freely Usable Photo and Video Content*

Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org

flickr – www.flickr.com/

creativecommons/ Common Content – www.commoncontent.org

Morguefile – www.morguefile.com/

Stock.XCHNG – www.sxc.hu

* Make sure to read license terms for individual content sources.

Educational Content/Curriculum

Wikibooks and Wikijunior – www.wikibooks.org

Free-Reading – www.free-reading.net

Curriki – www.curriki.org

WikiEducator – www.wikieducator.org

OER Commons – www.oercommomns.org

Learn NC www.learnnc.org

MIT OpenCourseware – http://ocw.mit.edu

Audio Books and Ebooks

LibriVox – www.librivox.org

Spoken Alexandria Project – www.spokenalex.org

Telltale Weekly – www.telltaleweekly.org

Project Gutenberg – www.gutenberg.org

LoudLit.org – www.loudlit.org

Lit2Go – http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/

How You Can Share with the World

  • Post photos to Flickr with an open license
  • If you see a mistake or opportunity for clarification in Wikipedia or another wiki, do it!
  • Add something to a topic you know about in Wikipedia
  • Create a new article in Wikipedia, Wikibooks, Wikitravel, or elsewhere
  • License your content (web site, lesson plans, photos, PPTs, etc.) with a CC license (We recommend CC BY SA for education.)
  • Contribute to Wikibooks, Curriki, WikiEducator, or other OER sites
  • Teach your students about open content
  • Tell your friends about OER