iPad Online Modules – 6

5. School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

At La Salle we want to be clear about our expectations with or without technology.  Below are some typical school scenarios and the related rules from the Acceptable Use Policy.  If you haven’t downloaded and read the Acceptable Use Policy, you should do that now.

Scenario #1:  A student finds an off-color cartoon that makes fun of people’s race or sexual orientation on Tumbler and posts it on Schoology for all to see.

Students may not create, send, access, upload, download, or distribute offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material.

Scenario #2:  A girl uses iMessage on her iPad to text her friend during class to discuss the upcoming Prom.

The use of social networks not authorized by the teacher for academic use is prohibited.

 

Scenario #3:  A boy finds someone’s iPad in the Library and attempts to log onto their account to see their files.

Gaining or attempting to gain access to other students’ or staff members’ accounts, files, and/or data is not allowed.

 

Scenario #4:  A student thinks it’s funny to photograph or videotape their teacher teaching a lesson and sends it to their classmates.

Publishing identifiable photographs or video of students, faculty, staff or administration without appropriate or prior written consent is prohibited.

 

Scenario #5:  A student is posting messages to Facebook during class and the teacher asks them to hand over their iPad.

Students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member.

 

Scenario #6:  A girl writes an essay on Google Docs and shares her work with a friend who downloads a copy and turns it in as her own work.

Plagiarizing academic materials, or otherwise is a violation of La Salle’s academic integrity policy.

 

Scenario #7:  A student creates a Twitter account using La Salle’s name and/or logo to post comments about what students wear to school.

Use of La Salle’s name, logo or identity in a way that negatively impacts the school’s reputation is prohibited.

 

Scenario #8:  A student brings their iPad to school but then realizes it has no battery left and cannot access the required textbook or complete the in-class iPad activity.

Students are to fully charge their iPad each night to ensure sufficient battery power to last throughout the school day.

 

From Acceptable Use Policy:

 

Violation of any of the rules from the Acceptable Use polices could result in disciplinary sanctions, including confiscation of device, restriction of network access, loss of co-curricular eligibility, suspension from school honor and service organizations, and suspension or expulsion from school.  It is important to know that La Salle’s code of conduct extends year round, to off campus activity as well as beyond the school day.  The expectation is that community members will contribute to a stable and productive computing environment using good and ethical judgment at all times.

Next:  Answer some questions about Digital Citizenship and the Acceptable Use Policy

 

 

 6.  Digital Responsibilities and Cyberbullying

 

1 Match the roles that different people play in cyberbullying situations.Matching – 1 point
· 2 Online bullying tends to escalate when multiple people become involved in the cruelty or bullying.
True/False – 1 point
· 3 All of these are things a TARGET should do if they are being bullied, except:Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 4 What advice would you give someone to convince them to be upstanding?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective
· 5 You don’t have to register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management (MDM) program in order to access the student wireless network.True/False – 1 point
· 6 Which of the following online activities will be given higher network priority over the others?Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 7 To maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during classtime.  Teachers may …Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 8 Creating, sending, accessing, uploading, downloading, or distributing offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material is prohibited at La Salle.True/False – 1 point
· 9 Taking or publishing photos or video of students or teachers is allowed.True/False – 1 point
10 What is the “Academic Mode” and how will you use it in class?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective

 

Next:  Module 3 Next Steps

iPad Online Modules – 5

3. Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time

Using the iPad for Learning

schoologyThe iPad is a great device for communicating, collaborating, and interacting with a variety of educational resources. Teachers will post class materials and resources on their Schoology page that you can access with the Schoology app.  You will download and access most of your textbooks on your iPad and use apps for instruction and review.   You will have 24/7 access to databases and eBooks and conduct Internet research whenever you need information. On the iPad you can create presentations to demonstrate your learning, type your papers, watch videos to learn new concepts and so much more.

Acceptable Use during Instructional Time

instructionalTo maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during class time.  Teachers will direct you when it is appropriate to use your iPad and when they want you to put it away.

We understand that it will be tempting to want to check your email, access social networks, or even play games when you have an iPad at your fingertips all the time. Our job at La Salle is to help you understand when that is appropriate and when you need to focus on academics.

Teachers or administrators may:

  1. Ask you to close apps that are not needed in class.
  2. Spot check to make sure you are using the appropriate resources.
  3. View or control your website usage using Teacher View.
  4. Limit the use of the camera, social networks, games, videos, email, etc.
  5. Ask all students to put their devices away.

According to the AUP, students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member. Even though you own your device, you do not have the right to display apps, music, movies, games or images that violate school policies while you are at school or attending school events.

“Academic Mode”

iPads are often used for recreational purposes, but in a 1:1 environment or when studying at home, it’s necessary to avoid the potential for distraction and focus on whatever task is at hand. Try to have a new mindset that iPads are treated as tools for learning, and not just devices for entertainment.

Challenge yourself to be fully present in class, during lunch and when doing homework. Avoid the temptation to go online, check your Facebook status or message your friends. Determine set times when you are going to access social networks.

Students should place their iPads in “Academic Mode” when they come into class or when completing homework. Academic Mode means:

  • Only needed academic files and applications are open or visible on your iPad.  Avoid having distracting applications visible while working on schoolwork.  This includes any non-academic applications, websites or notifications such as:  social media, messaging, games, news or email.
  • Turn off sounds and disable notifications or alerts.

To help yourself avoid distractions, temporarily turn off Wi-Fi when working with local files like textbooks, writing a paper or creating a presentation.  Be in charge of your online usage.

Next:  Be Respectful To Community Members

4. Be Respectful to Community Members

With 24/7 access, some students might use technology in inappropriate ways. Online cruelty, also referred to as cyberbullying, takes place whenever someone uses digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone else, often repeatedly.  People post things online that they wouldn’t say in person.

In this video from Common Sense Media, a teenage boy discusses the prevalence of saying hurtful things online and the impact those comments had on a particular friend.

http://youtu.be/YvpcWAZJzoY 

Is Ricardo is a cyberbully? He said he was just joking around. Ricardo is probably considered a cyberbully because he openly criticizes people online. On the other hand, we do not know how mean his comments were, and if he might change his behavior in the future. One of the issues with cyberbullying is the scale and the fact that it is public. Information generally travels faster and reaches more people on the Internet than offline, and this fact may make the impact harsher.

Ricardo thinks that harassing others on Internet, rather than in person, appeals to some teenagers because they can’t be attacked back physically.  People may cyberbully online because they do not have to face their target and can “hide” behind their computers. On the other hand, conflicts that start online often go offline at some point.

Have you ever encountered online cruelty? How do you think someone might feel after being the target of it?

Targets of online cruelty may feel they can be bombarded with negative comments at any time, anywhere. And when more offenders join in the online cruelty, the situation gets even worse. Watch this video and place yourself in Stacey’s shoes.

http://youtu.be/w4ugP_eQUR8

Who was involved in the story and what roles did they play?

  • Target: Stacey, whose intentions are misunderstood and who feels beaten down by being picked on offline and online
  • Offenders: The girl who misunderstood Stacey’s intent, as well as her friends who led the cruel online behavior
  • Bystanders: All of the people who might have stepped in but did not, including Stacey’s cousin and others at school or online
  • Upstander: Stacey’s mom, who empathized with Stacey and encouraged her to seek help from the school

As Stacey says, most of the comments were made anonymously and from “miles away.” It may be easier for offenders to be cruel when they are not face to face with their target. It’s easy for online cruelty to spread quickly, both because of the technology and because of the herd mentality.

Targets and Upstanders Can De-escalate Online Cruelty

You can make a difference — even if you are being targeted.  Here are a few ideas:

Targets:

  • Ignore and block the bully. Offenders often want attention. Take it away and they may give up.
  • Save the evidence. You may need it later for documentation.
  • Change your privacy settings. Allow only people you trust to see or comment on your pages.
  • Tell trusted friends and adults. Create a support network.

Don’t just ignore cyberbullying if you see it happening at La Salle.  Be an Upstander!

Upstanders:

  • Stand up to the offender when appropriate. If you see something negative, say something. Make it clear that you think online cruelty is wrong, and tell the offender to back off. (It may be easier to do this if you have good standing with the offender.)
  • Point out the bully’s motivation to the target. Comfort the target by explaining that many offenders act cruelly just to gain control, power, or status.
  • Help the target advocate. Help the target find friends and school leaders who can help de-escalate the situation. It’s easier to stand up to cruelty when you are not alone.

Bystanders may hesitate to get involved in a cyberbullying situation because they don’t want to become targets themselves. Put yourself in the target’s shoes. What would it feel like if nobody wanted to help you out when you needed it most? You can show support in many ways, even simply by listening to a target about his or her experience.

Next: School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

iPad Online Modules – 3

3.  Quiz: Student Responsibilities

1 Students are required to have a protective case for their iPad.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 2 Students must bring their iPads to school each day ….Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 3 Where is a good place to store your iPad during PE?Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 4 La Salle Prep will replace your personal iPad if it’s lost or stolen.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 5 If you accidentally leave your iPad at home, you will still be responsible for getting your class work completed as if you had your iPad present.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties

4. Optional Accessories

accessoriesIn addition to your iPad, you will probably want a set of headphones/ear buds (especially for World Language classes). You might also want to have a stylus for note taking and a keyboard for typing papers — but these are optional. You might want to use your iPad for a while before purchasing these items.

You will want to find a consistent place to store and care for your accessories. Unplug your headphones when not in use, as this provide an opportunity for breakage when you store the iPad.  Label all accessories with your full name.

Optional Accessories:

  1. Protective Case (is required) but neoprene sleeve or padded area in backpack is suggested
  2. Headphones or ear buds
  3. Keyboard
  4. Stylus

 

Next:  Acceptable Use

iPad Online Modules – 2

Taking Care of Your Mobile Device

Be Preparedbprepared

Being a good digital citizen and a responsible member of the La Salle Prep community means students come to school prepared to learn. Students must take good care of their iPads and bring them to school each day:

  • In good working condition.
  • In a protected case that meets the school’s requirements.
  • With sufficient storage available for school use.
  • With the appropriate apps and textbooks installed.
  • With the battery fully charged.

Be Carefulbecareful

It is expected that students will care for their iPad during use and transportation.  Students need to take ownership for his/her own digital property and should treat and use their iPads responsibly and appropriately.

  • Use an iPad case that covers the corners.
  • Clean your iPad with a soft cloth or consider using a screen protector.
  • Do not place heavy objects on the screen.
  • Store your iPad in a padded backpack or neoprene sleeve. Do not toss your backpack on the ground.
  • Avoid getting your iPad wet or leaving it in a hot car.

Be Securebesecure

La Salle Catholic College Preparatory takes no responsibility for stolen, lost or damaged iPads, including lost or corrupted data on the devices.  While school employees will help studentsidentify how to keep iPads secure, students will have the final responsibility for securing their personal iPad. This equipment is the personal property of the student/parent and is subject to inspection in accordance with the Acceptable Use Policy if found or confiscated.

  • Engrave your contact information on your iPad.  Label accessories with your name.
  • Lock your iPad in your locker when not using it.  Keep your locker locked.
  • Do not leave your iPad charging in an unsecure area.
  • Install the Find My iPad app on your device.
  • Keep your passcode private and do not lend your device to friends.
  • Backup up your data to a computer or iCloud.
  • Report your lost or stolen iPad to the school office immediately.

Members of The Tech Nest (La Salle’s student-run tech support group) created this video to remind you about some important tips for caring for your iPad.

http://youtu.be/vII4yg2P3iA 

Next:  Check your understanding with a Responsibility Quiz

iPad Online Modules – 1

For our mobile learning 1:1 program rollout, we are asking our students to go through a series of online modules using Schoology to review digital citizenship and our Acceptable Use policy, guidelines for setting up their iPads, which apps to install, care and use of their iPads, etc.

This series of blog posts will share the material for the online modules.  Schoology provides us the opportunity to require students to work through the modules one at a time and they can’t advance until they’ve met the completion rules (super great feature for online learning!).

Schoology
Online modules for mobile learning 1:1 program

 

MODULE 1: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Welcome

These mobile learning modules on Schoology aim to provide La Salle Prep students with information about the Mobile Learning Initiative focusing on policies, guidelines and practical information about using your personal iPad at school.

These modules serve as curriculum to complement the responsibilities and rules listed in the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) outlined in the student handbook.  Students will be required to have a copy of the AUP downloaded on their iPad in iBooks.

The modules will cover three main areas:

  • Module 1:  Student Responsibilities
  • Module 2:  Acceptable Use
  • Module 3:  Next Steps

Next:  Learn how to take care of your iPad.