Colette Cassinelli's visionary use of information literacy and educational technology

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Schoology Workflow on the iPad with Notability and Google Docs

Schoology Workflow on the iPad with Notability and Google Docs

A video to showcase how teachers at La Salle Prep are using Schoology with their students, including integration with Notability and Google Drive. Schoology Workflow video – watch on YouTube

8 Facets of Learning

8 Facets of Learning

A team of teachers and administrators at my school identified 8 FACETS of LEARNING as part of our 1:1 Mobile Learning Initiative where we feel that mobile devices could really impact student learning.  This is not an exhaustive list but represents how we need to really look […]

Photoshop video playlist

Photoshop video playlist

This is my collection of Photoshop editing videos that I use in my Multimedia/ Web Development class at La Salle Prep.  I find it very useful to make these screencast videos using Camtasia.  I use the videos to introduce the editing concepts in class and then the students use them for review whenever they need them.

This Photoshop playlist contains nine videos showcasing various editing techniques for Photoshop CS3.

Here are a few Photoshop CS3 tips:

  1. Use the Quick Selection tool (or marquee tools) to select a portion of an image and then apply the adjust layer to only that section.
  2. Adjustment Layer – An adjustment layer (Go to Layer / New Adjustment Layer) applies color and tonal adjustments to your image without permanently changing pixel values.  The adjustment layer sits on top of your image in the Layers Panel.  Paint on the adjustment layer’s image mask (with the black paintbrush) to apply an adjustment to part of an image (for example:  to allow the color to see through).
  3. Layer Effects & Styles (fx) – You can add a variety of effects—such as drop shadows, glows, strokes (outlines) and bevels—that change the appearance of a layer’s contents.  Go to Layer  / Layer Style and choose the appropriate effect OR use the (fx) icon on the bottom of the layers panel. You can apply layer effect to images or text.
  4. Filters – You can use filters to clean up or retouch your photos, apply special art effects that give your image the appearance of a sketch or impressionistic painting, or create unique transformations using distortions and lighting effects.  Go to Filter / Filter Gallery and choose the desired filter.  You can adjust the features of the filter by  using the slider bars in the panel.  Smart Filters applied to Smart Objectslets you use filters non-destructively & can be readjusted anytime.
  5. Mask – Select the portion of image with the Quick Selection tool or marquee and then go to Layer / Layer Mask and choose Hide All to hide everything except the selection.  This is a non-destructive to to cut out or MASK a portion of an image.  You can also use the mask icon at the bottom of the Layers panel.
  6. Because all of these adjustments are non-destructive you can into the layers panel and temporarily hide them or remove them if you want.
Mobile Learning Parent Meeting

Mobile Learning Parent Meeting

An essential part to rolling out any 1:1 mobile learning initiative is to get your parent community involved and provide opportunities to educate parents and answer any questions or concerns.  At La Salle Prep we put together a parent information night last Spring to present […]

iPad Online Modules – 7

iPad Online Modules – 7

MODULE 3:  NEXT STEPS 1. On Campus Bootcamp All students (incoming 9th-12th) are required to attend a 3 hour On-Campus Bootcamp in August held in the La Salle Library. Sign ups for On-Campus bootcamps will begin online on May 16th at 8am.  Click HERE if you have not signed […]

iPad Online Modules – 6

iPad Online Modules – 6

5. School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

At La Salle we want to be clear about our expectations with or without technology.  Below are some typical school scenarios and the related rules from the Acceptable Use Policy.  If you haven’t downloaded and read the Acceptable Use Policy, you should do that now.

Scenario #1:  A student finds an off-color cartoon that makes fun of people’s race or sexual orientation on Tumbler and posts it on Schoology for all to see.

Students may not create, send, access, upload, download, or distribute offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material.

Scenario #2:  A girl uses iMessage on her iPad to text her friend during class to discuss the upcoming Prom.

The use of social networks not authorized by the teacher for academic use is prohibited.

 

Scenario #3:  A boy finds someone’s iPad in the Library and attempts to log onto their account to see their files.

Gaining or attempting to gain access to other students’ or staff members’ accounts, files, and/or data is not allowed.

 

Scenario #4:  A student thinks it’s funny to photograph or videotape their teacher teaching a lesson and sends it to their classmates.

Publishing identifiable photographs or video of students, faculty, staff or administration without appropriate or prior written consent is prohibited.

 

Scenario #5:  A student is posting messages to Facebook during class and the teacher asks them to hand over their iPad.

Students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member.

 

Scenario #6:  A girl writes an essay on Google Docs and shares her work with a friend who downloads a copy and turns it in as her own work.

Plagiarizing academic materials, or otherwise is a violation of La Salle’s academic integrity policy.

 

Scenario #7:  A student creates a Twitter account using La Salle’s name and/or logo to post comments about what students wear to school.

Use of La Salle’s name, logo or identity in a way that negatively impacts the school’s reputation is prohibited.

 

Scenario #8:  A student brings their iPad to school but then realizes it has no battery left and cannot access the required textbook or complete the in-class iPad activity.

Students are to fully charge their iPad each night to ensure sufficient battery power to last throughout the school day.

 

From Acceptable Use Policy:

 

Violation of any of the rules from the Acceptable Use polices could result in disciplinary sanctions, including confiscation of device, restriction of network access, loss of co-curricular eligibility, suspension from school honor and service organizations, and suspension or expulsion from school.  It is important to know that La Salle’s code of conduct extends year round, to off campus activity as well as beyond the school day.  The expectation is that community members will contribute to a stable and productive computing environment using good and ethical judgment at all times.

Next:  Answer some questions about Digital Citizenship and the Acceptable Use Policy

 

 

 6.  Digital Responsibilities and Cyberbullying

 

1 Match the roles that different people play in cyberbullying situations.Matching – 1 point
· 2 Online bullying tends to escalate when multiple people become involved in the cruelty or bullying.
True/False – 1 point
· 3 All of these are things a TARGET should do if they are being bullied, except:Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 4 What advice would you give someone to convince them to be upstanding?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective
· 5 You don’t have to register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management (MDM) program in order to access the student wireless network.True/False – 1 point
· 6 Which of the following online activities will be given higher network priority over the others?Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 7 To maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during classtime.  Teachers may …Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 8 Creating, sending, accessing, uploading, downloading, or distributing offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material is prohibited at La Salle.True/False – 1 point
· 9 Taking or publishing photos or video of students or teachers is allowed.True/False – 1 point
10 What is the “Academic Mode” and how will you use it in class?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective

 

Next:  Module 3 Next Steps

iPad Online Modules – 5

iPad Online Modules – 5

3. Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time Using the iPad for Learning The iPad is a great device for communicating, collaborating, and interacting with a variety of educational resources. Teachers will post class materials and resources on their Schoology page that you can access with […]

iPad Online  Modules – 4

iPad Online Modules – 4

MODULE 2: ACCEPTABLE USE 1. Introduction: Acceptable Use Policy The mobile learning program at La Salle provides tools and resources for a 21st century education, empowering you to maximize your potential in preparation for college and the workplace. Using iPads offers an opportunity for you […]

iPad Online Modules – 3

iPad Online Modules – 3

3.  Quiz: Student Responsibilities

1 Students are required to have a protective case for their iPad.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 2 Students must bring their iPads to school each day ….Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 3 Where is a good place to store your iPad during PE?Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 4 La Salle Prep will replace your personal iPad if it’s lost or stolen.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 5 If you accidentally leave your iPad at home, you will still be responsible for getting your class work completed as if you had your iPad present.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties

4. Optional Accessories

accessoriesIn addition to your iPad, you will probably want a set of headphones/ear buds (especially for World Language classes). You might also want to have a stylus for note taking and a keyboard for typing papers — but these are optional. You might want to use your iPad for a while before purchasing these items.

You will want to find a consistent place to store and care for your accessories. Unplug your headphones when not in use, as this provide an opportunity for breakage when you store the iPad.  Label all accessories with your full name.

Optional Accessories:

  1. Protective Case (is required) but neoprene sleeve or padded area in backpack is suggested
  2. Headphones or ear buds
  3. Keyboard
  4. Stylus

 

Next:  Acceptable Use

iPad Online Modules – 2

iPad Online Modules – 2

Taking Care of Your Mobile Device Be Prepared Being a good digital citizen and a responsible member of the La Salle Prep community means students come to school prepared to learn. Students must take good care of their iPads and bring them to school each […]

iPad Online Modules – 1

iPad Online Modules – 1

For our mobile learning 1:1 program rollout, we are asking our students to go through a series of online modules using Schoology to review digital citizenship and our Acceptable Use policy, guidelines for setting up their iPads, which apps to install, care and use of […]

Presenting & Archiving

Presenting & Archiving

Presentation and Archiving

Presentation and archiving tools allow students to present projects to the instructor, to the class, or to the general public. Communication tools also factor heavily into this phase of project-based collaborative learning.  Oftentimes the co-creation tool will also be used as the presentation tool but there are some collaborative technology tools that are mainly used for sharing or downloading the presentation.

Presentations:SlideShare

SlideShare – Teachers or students can upload documents and presentations to SlideShare to share ideas, conduct research, connect with others or make their presentation public. Anyone can view presentations & documents on topics that interest them, download them and reuse or remix for their own work.

Google Slides – Students can create beautiful slides with the presentation editor, which supports things like embedded videos, animations and dynamic slide transitions. Publish the presentations on the web so anyone can view them, or share them with a chosen group of users.  (Updated note:  If you have previously published Google Presentations using the “old” Google Docs – before the transition to Google Drive – you might want to go through and make sure that they are still marked as “published to the web” otherwise users may not be able to view your presentations.)  Users can also upload presentations made with PowerPoint or Keynote into Google Slides but some formatting or animations may be lost.

VoiceThread:  A VoiceThread is a collaborative, multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos and allows people to navigate slides and leave comments in 5 ways – using voice through a Facebook Fan Page (with a mic or telephone), text, audio file, or video (via a webcam). VoiceThread is a perfect platform to use when you want to share presentations using an asynchronous method. Users can doodle while commenting, use multiple identities, and pick which comments are shown through moderation. VoiceThreads can even be embedded to show and receive comments on other websites.  K-16 VoiceThread examples.

Prezi:  Prezi is a virtual whiteboard that transforms presentations where images and words work together to present an idea or lesson.  With Prezi Meeting, teams can collaborate live or simply present prezis with up to 10 people in a prezi at one time. Prezi Meeting is included in all license types.

Haiku Deck (iPad app) and the newly updated Haiku Deck Web enables anyone to create beautiful slide presentations.  Haiku Deck intentionally limits how much text that you can put on each of your slides and it helps you find Creative Commons licensed images for your presentations. When you type a word or words on your slides you can have Haiku Deck search for images for you. The images that Haiku Deck serves up are large enough to completely fill your slide. You can also upload your own images from your iPad or import images from Instagram and Facebook.  Another excellent presentation app is Keynote.

 


Websites:

Students can build project sites without writing a single line of code using Google Sites. It’s as easy as writing a document and to save time, teachers can provide students with pre-built templates. Students can present their content and embed in all sorts of gadgets from documents to videos to images to shared calendars and more.  Student or teacher-created websites are also great for archiving student projects from year to year.

Some other easy website creation tools are:  WixWeebly for EducationYola and Webs.


Jing

Screencasting:  A screencast is a digital recording (movie) that captures actions taking place on a computer desktop or tablet device.  Screencasting is another asynchronous platform for creating and sharing presentations or tutorials.  The movies can be embedded or shared by the link.  Screencasts are very popular with the “flipped classroom” or “reverse instruction” programs.

There a lot of free apps out on the web for screencasting, most of which also have paid versions that provide more capabilities.  Screencast-O-Matic was one of the first screencasting tools published and is still around (and kept up to date).  It works with both the Mac and the PC and requires no installation.  The same folks who make Camtasia (paid software) make Jing – a popular app that lets you easily capture screen activity, record voice-over, and publish clips up to 5 minutes long. Screenr is another popular, free, web-based screencasting tool that works with the Mac and PC.

 


Miscellaneous publishing or presentation tools:

  • Animoto (Education edition) is an easy way to create and share videos. The online video maker turns your photos, video clips and music into video in minutes.
  • Glogster EDU allows students to combine images, video, music, photos and audio to create multimedia pages. Glogs can be embedded into any webpage.
  • Issuu and Scribd are digital publishing platforms of user-created magazines, catalogs, and newspapers.
  • Museum Box provides the tools for students to build up an argument or description of an event, person or historical period by placing items in a virtual box. You can add text, images, video and sound to the side of the cubes.
  • iBooks Author is a Mac app that allows anyone to create multi-touch textbooks or books to be viewed on the iPad.
  • Snapguide is a free iOS app and web service for those that want to create and share step-by-step “how to guides.”
Consensus Building & Polling Tools

Consensus Building & Polling Tools

Consensus Building Consensus-building tools help participants narrow and refine proposed solutions of a project.  They are also useful in facilitating the two key requirements for reaching agreements in a work group setting by identifying and understanding issues and resolving conflicts. Teachers and students can facilitate […]

Co-Creation & Ideation Tools

Co-Creation & Ideation Tools

Co-creation and ideation tools facilitate the most direct interaction between team members on the goals or desired outcomes of the project. Using these tools, participants can often work in groups directly editing or building the project artifact.  Several of these tools are the same ones […]

Resource Management Tools

Resource Management Tools

Keeping track of resources when doing projects can be time-consuming and challenging in a collaborative environment. A simple sortable spreadsheet can be used to track member’s progress, schedules, resources, assets, and contacts.  Each member can refer to the document to know the next steps, click on links to shared documents or document their own contribution.  Teachers can easily refer to the document to check progress or leave comments to the whole team.  Google Sheets or Zoho Creator are two great options – each with their own strengths and purpose. Younger students might find using a wiki easier for managing groups projects or even Edmodo because they can have conversations and include links at the same time. Another great option for organizing online resources is using an online bookmarking tool.

Social Bookmarking is a method for users to store, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages on the Internet with the help of metadata or tags and then share ideas with others.  These tools work great for collaborative projects because each member of the project can locate online resources and easily share them with group members through tagging.  When you sort your bookmarks by tags you can also see other popular bookmarks made by others who used the same tag. These curated links can help you discover new resources such as websites, pdfs, videos and images. Member of group projects can invent a special tag for their project or send their bookmarks directly to team members or by setting up a group. The two main social bookmarking websites that are used in education today are:  Diigo and Delicious.

DiigoDiigo is social bookmarking plus has features like adding sticky notes and highlighting on the web. Special premium accounts are available for K-12 and higher education at Education Diigo with these features:

  • You can create student accounts for an entire class with just a few clicks (and student email addresses are optional for account creation)
  • Students of the same class are automatically set up as a Diigo group so they can start using all the benefits that a Diigo group provides, such as group bookmarks and annotations, and group forums.
  • Privacy settings of student accounts are pre-set so that only teachers and classmates can communicate with them.
  • Ads presented to student account users are limited to education-related sponsors.

Pinterest is a popular tool to use for organizing online resources but students may not consider using it in an educational setting. Since you can create new boards, move pins from one board to another, and even subscribe to boards made by others, students might find it to be a fun and creative way to gather resources – especially visuals – for a collaborative project. Example of a Pinterest board:  New in Young Adult Fiction. Other related resource gathering tools worth checking out are:  Scoop-itLiveBinders, and Symbaloo

 

Picasa Web AlbumsPhotographs online – Flickr and Picasa Web Albums (which has been incorporated into Google+ Photos) are two photosharing web services. Both have tagging and sorting functions that encourage collaboration and community building. This is a  great place to share images for collaborative projects and determine whether you want to make the albums public or private. Don’t forget to review your school’s Acceptable Use Policy before you start allowing students to use online photo sharing.

Here are some ideas for using online images in the classroom:

  • Web albums can be embedded into other Web 2.0 tools like wikis and Google Docs and that streamlines the process of adding images to projects since the images are already online and don’t need to be re-uploaded (saves time and bandwidth).  Plus any group member can contribute to the album.
  • Another feature of online images is that they can be geo-tagged so that the location of the image can be tracked or be combined with a map.
  • Online image albums are a great way to document each step of a collaborative project.  Put one student in charge of taking photos along the way so the images be used when students are reflecting on their own learning during the evaluation process.
  • Images in web albums can be used for story starters, collaborative books, scrapbooks, photo journals, maps, screenshots, or capturing the notes on a whiteboard.

Other options for storing images online:  Upload directly into Google Drive for storage, embed them into project notes created with Evernote, or add them as attachments by email, on a Google Site or wiki.

Other Media:  Often students will want to use a variety of media during collaborative projects.  While it would be challenging for students to edit videos and audio files in the same program at the same time, many options are available for broadcasting or embedding media to intended audiences.  Media files can simply be stored online for sharing with group members using Google Drive or DropBox.

Here are few media resources worth reviewing:

  • YouTube is blocked in many schools but educators are now finding so many useful resources there that many schools are reconsidering their policies or considering YouTube for Schools. Here you can access or upload educational videos on YouTube in a controlled environment.  Note: YouTube EDU is a sub-section of YouTube that contains high-quality educational content. YouTube for Schools is a network setting that, when implemented, allows your school to access the educational content on YouTube EDU while limiting access to non-educational content on YouTube.com. YouTube.com/Teachers is a how-to site that shows you how to use YouTube in the classroom.
  • Podcasts are audio files that are uploaded online and shared through programs like iTunes or Juice.  An excellent Podcasting resource is from Wes Fryer at:  http://www.speedofcreativity.org/resources/podcast-resources/.
  • VoiceThread is a multimedia platform that encourages discussions about images, video and documents.