Narrated Slideshows (pt 2)

Notes from our Narrated Slideshow professional development session at school:

Narrated Slideshows give students an authentic voice to a  larger audience.  It raises the engagement level by providing an alternate to the traditional “write a paper” lesson.  Consider having students create narrated slideshows vs. listening to 30 presentations during class.  Embed the videos on a webpage or wiki or create a YouTube playlist.

Ideas for narrated slideshows:

  • iMovie app iconSpeeches
  • News shows
  • How to videos (take photos during Lab and record directions; PE)
  • Language practice
  • Meditations or prayer

The bulk of the instruction takes place before you even use the iMovie app

Using iMovie app to make the narrated slideshow

  • You must insert images into iMovie before you can record a narration.
  • Have student “chunk” their editing:  Insert 3-4 images, record narration that goes along with images, edit the length of duration of images to match narration, add titles, etc
  • Repeat for each section – vs trying to record the whole narration in one sitting

Benefits of using iMovie on the iPad

  • Students can record in the privacy of their bedroom – less background noise & better vocal quality if you take time to rehearse
  • Students can re-record sections
  • Easier to complete the assignment since they have iPad 24/7
  • Easy to import images from camera roll
  • Upload final movie to YouTube using account for easy sharing


  • Limit the speeches to 4-7 minutes otherwise you need too many images to make the video interesting.
  • Takes up space on iPad
  • Must be in quiet room when recording narration
  • Must transfer images to Camera roll (use Google Drive)
  • Takes time after editing to export the video and/or upload to YouTube (requires wifi)

Adobe Voice appDon’t have time to dedicate to the editing process using iMovie?  Consider these apps instead:

  • Adobe Voice – super easy storytelling app that makes it easy to record & re-record individual slides
  • Any screencasting app:  ShowMe, EduCreations, or Explain Everything


Part 1:  Step-by-step directions for iMovie on the iPad


Using iMovie for Narrated Speeches

My Multimedia class is considered a “Communications credit” since students learn how to communicate through visual images, web design, multimedia and spoken word.  One of the assignments is to prepare a speech orally in class and another is to create a narrated speech using iMovie.  Below are the directions I give to my students on creating these narrated movies.

YouTube playlist featuring iMovie Speech projects from December 2014

Creating a Narrated Slideshow using iMovie on the iPad

When recording a narrated speech using iMovie you must pay close attention to the quality of your voice, inflection, and pronunciation.  The visual images are even more important than when you give a speech orally in class because your audience is not looking at you during the speech.  The audience pays more attention to your choice of images, how they are manipulated and why you chose specific images to match your message.

Some things to consider before making an iMovie narrated slideshow:

  • Choose good quality images that are large enough (horizontal layout works best).  You probably want to change the image every 10-15 seconds during the speech.
  • Make sure your speech recording is loud enough or adjust the volume.  Rehearse!  Change your voice, inflection and have perfect pronunciation.  Record small sections of your project at a time.  This will make it easier to trim the beginning/end of each section.
  • Consider varying the look of your images.  Trying zooming in using the Ken Burns feature; other times have your image be full screen or try varying the transitions.
  • Add a title before the movie or on the opening image.
  • Give yourself credit with the title or at the end. (optional)
  • If you decide to have background music, turn down the volume on that track so it doesn’t drown out your speech. (optional)

Creating  your iMovie on your iPad — Narrated Slideshow

  1. Open the iMovie App.  Create a new project by choosing the + in the upper right hand of screen (not a movie trailer).
  2. Tips:  Turn your iPad sideways for full screen access.  Make sure your selected images are in your Camera Roll before you begin.
  3. Insert the 2-3 images for your Introduction to the timeline.  Click on the image to adjust color effects, if desired.
  4. Select the first image on the timeline and then select the T from the lower toolbar to add a Title to the opening image.  You can also add titles on individual images, if desired.
  5. Select the microphone in the lower right hand of screen to record the narration of your introduction.  Adjust the volume as needed.
  6. Adjust the timing of each of the images by pinching in/out to trim to desired length making all images equal to the narration.
  7. Transitions are automatically added in between each image but the length and type can be changed, if desired.
  8. Adjust the length of all images and transitions so the images match up with the audio recording.
  9. Optional:  You can add Theme Music as background music but make sure to turn the volume low so it doesn’t complete with your narration.
  10. Repeat these directions for each section of your narrated speech.

Ken Burns Effect on still images

You can adjust the Ken Burns effect so that the motion starts and ends on the parts of the image you specify.

  1. In the timeline, tap the photo you want to adjust.
  2. The Ken Burns effect controls appear in the lower-right corner of the image in the viewer.
  3. To set the way the photo is framed at the beginning, tap the Start button .
  4. Pinch to zoom in or out, then drag the image in the viewer to frame it the way you want.
  5. To set the way the photo is framed at the end, tap the End button .
  6. Pinch to zoom in or out, then drag the image in the viewer to frame it the way you want.
  7. To close the controls, tap the Ken Burns Effect button , or tap outside of the clip.
  8. If you don’t want the Ken Burns effect applied to a photo, set the image position and zoom level to be the same for the start and end points.

Finalizing your iMovie Project

  1. When done editing, return to the main iMovie Project menu and change the name of your project.
  2. Click the preview arrow to watch the entire movie before finalizing.
  3. Select the Export icon and share the movie with iMovie Theater. iMovie Theater will rebuild your movie frame-by-frame and play it full screen on your ipad.
  4. Go back to main iMovie screen where you see three options (Video, Projects, Theater) and choose the Theater option.  Play your movie here.
  5. If desired, select the Export icon and export your iMovie project to YouTube using your email account.

ADE Class of 2015 Application

I am applying for the Apple Distinguished Educator program for 2015.  There are many reasons why I want to be involved in this program.  Its not about the title or its exclusiveness. Now that we are completely immersed in our 1:1 environment at my school, I am looking for a professional community where I can be inspired and see best practices but also contribute my own learning. 

My school went 1:1 with iPads this past year but I have been actively involved in the planning during the last three years. I spent an incredible amount of time in the planning process, evaluating devices, choosing eTextbooks, training the faculty, and preparing our students by running the iPad online modules and bootcamp.  I learned so much working closely with our Mobile Learning Initiative team. 

My ADE Application video

I recently spoke with our local rep and he told me there are less than 10 educators in the Northwest who have the designation of “Apple Distinguished Educator.”  I was surprised. There are many places like Texas and Florida that host fabulous iPad events –  we need to bring that type of energy to the NW and I want to be part of it. 

I am realistic and I know the selection process is very competitive but I truly believe I have something to offer the ADE community. Thanks to my ADE friends and the #adechat community who have encouraged me to apply. I am honored to be considered!


ISTE 2015 – Unleash the Power of Your iPad with “App Smashing”

Join me at #ISTE2015 and come play and learn the power of App Smashing, the process of using multiple apps in conjunction with one another to complete a new and creative final task or project. We’ll put together fun combinations of apps to use with middle and high school formative assessments, presentations and student work.

Pre-registration required. Register now! Seats are still available.
[Explore and Create : BYOD]
Wednesday, July 1, 1:15–2:15 pm

Purpose & objective

The purpose of this session is to provide participants with a hands-on session where they can extend the power of their iPad or mobile device to improve student learning – specifically geared towards middle and high school students. Participants will learn about and explore various iPads apps and learn how “smash” the apps together to form a new product. Workflow solutions will be share as well as suggestions for managing classroom activities.

ISTE 2015

Essential Questions:

How does using mobile devices encourage creativity and collaboration?
How can I encourage problem-solving by “thinking outside the box” and brainstorming solutions?
How can I combine free apps to create a new and unique product?
How can I plan workflow routines that keep students focused on learning and not just on doing?
How can my student showcase their creations for authentic audiences?

Participants will demonstrate success by documenting their app smashing product and sharing during the public showcase.


1. Introduction / Goals
2. App Smashing defined – kudos to Greg Kulowiec for the term.
3. App Smashing showcase – share real examples gathered from classrooms.
Basic Example: Camera roll + Photo/Strip Designer + Thinklink/Explain Everything = Interactive photos with narrations and links.
4. App Smashing workflow tips: Begin with the end in mind, brainstorm apps that will be smashed, decide smashing workflow. storage and transfer, and then create the final product and decide how it can be shared.
5. Let the Smashing Begin! Workshop members will create project for their subject area.

Step One: Create products from apps that can be “smashed” using: the camera roll, photo editing apps, comic strip apps, simple presentation apps, simple video apps — which then … Step Two: Can be combined with more sophisticated apps that allow embedding, annotations, narrations or sharing/publishing to a wider audience.

6. Academic App Smashing: combining apps to improve and produce a smoother and seamless academic workflow. Example: Schoology + Notability + Google Drive apps = assignments that have annotations which then can be shared with small groups.
7. Share final products using a Gallery Showcase.
8. Questions / Evaluations

Supporting research

App Smashing – Unleasing Creativity by Greg Kulowiec

App Smash Creations –

App Synergy –

The Definitive App Smashing Guide –


Schoology Workflow on the iPad with Notability and Google Docs

A video to showcase how teachers at La Salle Prep are using Schoology with their students, including integration with Notability and Google Drive.

Schoology Workflow video – watch on YouTube


8 Facets of Learning

A team of teachers and administrators at my school identified 8 FACETS of LEARNING as part of our 1:1 Mobile Learning Initiative where we feel that mobile devices could really impact student learning.  This is not an exhaustive list but represents how we need to really look beyond the iPad as a  consumer device and look for opportunities for content-creation, authentic learning experiences and collaborative projects. Focusing on the learning objective is essential when planning on using devices in your classroom.  The embedded presentation showcases a few of the ways that we plan for this focus.


Photoshop video playlist

This is my collection of Photoshop editing videos that I use in my Multimedia/ Web Development class at La Salle Prep.  I find it very useful to make these screencast videos using Camtasia.  I use the videos to introduce the editing concepts in class and then the students use them for review whenever they need them.

This Photoshop playlist contains nine videos showcasing various editing techniques for Photoshop CS3.

Here are a few Photoshop CS3 tips:

  1. Use the Quick Selection tool (or marquee tools) to select a portion of an image and then apply the adjust layer to only that section.
  2. Adjustment Layer – An adjustment layer (Go to Layer / New Adjustment Layer) applies color and tonal adjustments to your image without permanently changing pixel values.  The adjustment layer sits on top of your image in the Layers Panel.  Paint on the adjustment layer’s image mask (with the black paintbrush) to apply an adjustment to part of an image (for example:  to allow the color to see through).
  3. Layer Effects & Styles (fx) – You can add a variety of effects—such as drop shadows, glows, strokes (outlines) and bevels—that change the appearance of a layer’s contents.  Go to Layer  / Layer Style and choose the appropriate effect OR use the (fx) icon on the bottom of the layers panel. You can apply layer effect to images or text.
  4. Filters – You can use filters to clean up or retouch your photos, apply special art effects that give your image the appearance of a sketch or impressionistic painting, or create unique transformations using distortions and lighting effects.  Go to Filter / Filter Gallery and choose the desired filter.  You can adjust the features of the filter by  using the slider bars in the panel.  Smart Filters applied to Smart Objectslets you use filters non-destructively & can be readjusted anytime.
  5. Mask – Select the portion of image with the Quick Selection tool or marquee and then go to Layer / Layer Mask and choose Hide All to hide everything except the selection.  This is a non-destructive to to cut out or MASK a portion of an image.  You can also use the mask icon at the bottom of the Layers panel.
  6. Because all of these adjustments are non-destructive you can into the layers panel and temporarily hide them or remove them if you want.

Mobile Learning Parent Meeting

An essential part to rolling out any 1:1 mobile learning initiative is to get your parent community involved and provide opportunities to educate parents and answer any questions or concerns.  At La Salle Prep we put together a parent information night last Spring to present an overview of how mobile devices will impact student learning, plans for digital citizenship lessons, updates on infrastructure, information about eTextbooks, etc.

Parents had a choice to attend two of four sessions:

I presented on eBooks and Digital Resources.  We decided to attempt to convert most paper textbooks to digital versions.  Every department conducted a lengthy review of textbooks and chose the best for their subjects.  At this point many textbook companies aren’t quite ready to offer every textbook in digital format.  We also were looking for stand alone textbooks vs. purchasing subscriptions that we needed to manage.

Here are some presentation notes:

eTextbooks:  An important aspect of La Salle’s 1:1 mobile learning program

iBooksLa Salle Prep is committed to securing eTextbooks for most classes next year so that students will be able to use their iPads for course materials.  Teachers have spent considerable time this school year reviewing and selecting eTextbook options for their classes.  These textbooks are from a variety of different publishers and available in various formats:  iBooks (iTunes store), Kno Textbooks, Pearson eText, non-fiction books purchased with Kindle app for iPad or Google Play Store, and eTextbooks by specific publishers.

Once the student schedules are complete in early summer and shared with families, La Salle will make the textbook list available on the La Salle Prep website.  This listing will include: course, title, author, price, format and a direct link of where to purchase the eTextbook. iBooks can be purchased in the iTunes App Store.  Families can purchase an iTunes gift card for their child and load the value onto an iTunes account to purchase iBooks and apps.  Families might consider a family iTunes account to purchase eTextbooks to share books with siblings but then each individual child can have their own iTunes account for personal use. Families will need to coordinate credit card purchases with their son/daughter for books that need to be purchased by specific publishers, Kindle store (Amazon) or the Google Play store.

Most textbooks fall between the $15 – $25 range except for some of the specialty AP eTextbooks which are priced more like college-level textbooks. There is no need to purchase the materials too early.  It is better to wait until the student’s schedule has been confirmed before purchasing books because you are buying them direct from the publishers. La Salle Prep will not be responsible for refunds if your child changes classes.

The La Salle Prep Library has invested in numerous digital resources to support the 1:1 mobile learning initiative.  This includes digital databases, non-fiction and reference eBooks, links to free Project Gutenburg ebooks in ourDestiny Library catalog, video tutorials for specific apps and iPad procedures, and more.  Many teachers will also provide course materials through Schoology, use Google Apps for productivity tools or may require specific apps for class.

We are making every effort to assist students and families with the transition to a mobile learning environment.  All students will be required to complete Online Modules (posted in Schoology) that will cover basic use and care of an iPad, digital citizenship, rights and responsibilities.  The modules will also cover steps students should take to prepare their iPad for the first day of school.  These modules will be available beginning in early June.

All students will also be required to attend a 3 hour On-Campus Bootcamp in August.  Sign ups for iPad bootcamps will begin online on May 16th.  Students should bring their iPad to the bootcamp to register their device with La Salle’s mobile device management system and set up appropriate accounts like email, Schoology, Google Apps,etc.

Many students have commented that they are looking forward to having all of their textbooks on one device and they won’t have to carry around such a heavy backpack.

Using eTextbooks is an important component to the success of our 1:1 mobile learning program.  Please contact Mario De Ieso if you have further questions.


iPad Online Modules – 7


1. On Campus Bootcamp

bootcampAll students (incoming 9th-12th) are required to attend a 3 hour On-Campus Bootcamp in August held in the La Salle Library.

Sign ups for On-Campus bootcamps will begin online on May 16th at 8am.  Click HERE if you have not signed up for a bootcamp.  

After registering for your bootcamp you will receive a confirmation email and certificate. Bring your certificate to the On Campus Bootcamp indicating your completion of the Online Module.

If you need to change your bootcamp or cannot attend one of the sessions, please contact Mrs. Colette Cassinelli (

Students should bring their iPad to the bootcamp to register their device with La Salle’s mobile device management system and set up appropriate accounts like email, Schoology, Google Apps, etc.

Next:  Apple ID & iTunes Account

2. Apple ID & iTunes Account


appleidStudents will be required to have an Apple ID and dedicated iTunes account in order to download apps and receive content provided by the school through the Mobile Device Management program.

An Apple ID is a user name you use for everything you do with Apple. Creating an account for an Apple service, such as the iTunes Store or the App Store, creates an Apple ID.  You don’t have to create a new account for each service—just use your Apple ID. From FAQ about Apple ID.


  1. Each student signs up for their own iTunes account and creates an unique Apple ID for purchasing apps, books, etc.  Consider using your school email address ( and/or your own personal email address for this account.  You can use an existing Apple ID for your iPad but it will probably require you to add a credit card to your account (see below).
  2. Create a family iTunes account for major purchases such as textbooks.  Use the family Apple ID for purchases and register a credit card but then log out of that account and have each student log in with their own Apple ID to download free apps or backup their files.  This might be helpful for families that have multiple children at La Salle and plan on sharing textbooks from year to year.
  3. Loading iTunes giftcards onto an iTunes account is a great way for students to purchase books in the iBooks store or apps in the iTunes app store.  Please note that not all textbooks will be located in the iBooks store.

Here is a helpful tip for new iTunes account users on the iPad:  Create an Apple ID in the application store without having to use any form of payment method:

1. First download any FREE application inside the store on any Apple device without an account.

2. Once the pop up window opens, hit ‘CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT.’

3. Make sure you use a fresh, new email that you have not yet attempted to use prior to this explanation (this might be a good time to create an account with your account.)

4. Fill in the required fields to continue on to the second page.

5. Once you are on the page that asks for your payment information, on the top section, grouped in under the credit cards, there will be an option labled ‘NONE.’ Select it, and fill in your billing information.

6.  Unfortunately, this option is NOT available for exisiting accounts. Contact iTunes Support for assistance.

More information about Apple ID at:

Next:  Things To Do Before The On-Campus Bootcamp

3. Things To Do Before the On-Campus Bootcamp


checklistThe On-Campus bootcamp is a 3-hour workshop and we want to make the best use of our time.  Please complete the following steps before attending your selected session.

  1. Purchase your iPad and protective cover and bring it to bootcamp.  You will register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management program during the bootcamp.
  2. Create an Apple ID and be able to access the iTunes App store and iBooks store.  Make sure you know your password so you can download apps at the On-Campus bootcamp.
  3. Download the following apps that we will use during the bootcamp workshop:
    1. Schoology – If you are a current La Salle student, practice logging in with your username and password.  New and incoming students will receive credentials in the mail this summer.  We will set up your profile, notifications, and check your time-zone during the bootcamp.
    2. Google Drive – La Salle Prep is a Google Apps for Education school. We will set up your email, calendar, and Drive folders during one of the sessions.
    3. PowerSchool for Students – This is our grade reporting software.  It won’t be useful until the school year starts but make sure you have a copy before then.
    4. iBooks – App for reading iBook textbooks or pdf files.  We’ll create collections in iBooks for your files.
    5. Destiny Quest – This app that allows you to access the online Library catalog and collection of eBooks.  We will set up your username and password.
    6. Find My iPhone – This app works for any IOS device is helpful for locating misplaced devices.  Students will sign-in with their Apple ID using iCloud to practice locating their device.
    7. i-nigma – This is a QR code reader that we will use during the Bootcamp.
    8. Optional:  Have an iTunes gift card loaded onto your account so you can practice purchasing apps or iBooks.
    9. Optional:  These are some FREE apps recommended by La Salle Teachers:GaragebandiTunes U,  EduCreationsHaiku Deck,Socrative Student,FlipboardPreziPhonto and Pic Stitch.  Teachers will list additional paid apps needed with the textbook list or with their course syllabus.
  4. Fill out the form on the next page indicating you have completed the Online Modules.  A certificate will be emailed to you.  Print it out and bring it to the On-Campus Bootcamp to show that you have met this requirement.

PLEASE NOTE:  We encourage you to WAIT to purchase any textbooks until you are sure that you will be enrolled in the course.  

Once the student schedules are complete in early summer and shared with families, La Salle will make the textbook list available on the La Salle Prep website.  This listing will include: course, title, author, price, format and a direct link of where to purchase the eTextbook. 

Most textbooks fall between the $15 – $25 range except for some of the specialty AP eTextbooks that are priced more like college-level textbooks. There is no need to purchase the materials too early.  It is better to wait until the student’s schedule has been confirmed before purchasing books because you are buying them direct from the publishers. La Salle Prep will not be responsible for refunds if your child changes classes.

Next:  Congratulations!

4. Congratulations!

Congratulations!  You have completed your Online Modules.  Fill out this form and a certificate will be emailed to you indicating your completion.  Print and bring your certificate to the On-Campus Bootcamp to show you have met this requirement.

We will see you at the On-Campus Bootcamp in August!

Click here if you cannot see the form




iPad Online Modules – 6

5. School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

At La Salle we want to be clear about our expectations with or without technology.  Below are some typical school scenarios and the related rules from the Acceptable Use Policy.  If you haven’t downloaded and read the Acceptable Use Policy, you should do that now.

Scenario #1:  A student finds an off-color cartoon that makes fun of people’s race or sexual orientation on Tumbler and posts it on Schoology for all to see.

Students may not create, send, access, upload, download, or distribute offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material.

Scenario #2:  A girl uses iMessage on her iPad to text her friend during class to discuss the upcoming Prom.

The use of social networks not authorized by the teacher for academic use is prohibited.


Scenario #3:  A boy finds someone’s iPad in the Library and attempts to log onto their account to see their files.

Gaining or attempting to gain access to other students’ or staff members’ accounts, files, and/or data is not allowed.


Scenario #4:  A student thinks it’s funny to photograph or videotape their teacher teaching a lesson and sends it to their classmates.

Publishing identifiable photographs or video of students, faculty, staff or administration without appropriate or prior written consent is prohibited.


Scenario #5:  A student is posting messages to Facebook during class and the teacher asks them to hand over their iPad.

Students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member.


Scenario #6:  A girl writes an essay on Google Docs and shares her work with a friend who downloads a copy and turns it in as her own work.

Plagiarizing academic materials, or otherwise is a violation of La Salle’s academic integrity policy.


Scenario #7:  A student creates a Twitter account using La Salle’s name and/or logo to post comments about what students wear to school.

Use of La Salle’s name, logo or identity in a way that negatively impacts the school’s reputation is prohibited.


Scenario #8:  A student brings their iPad to school but then realizes it has no battery left and cannot access the required textbook or complete the in-class iPad activity.

Students are to fully charge their iPad each night to ensure sufficient battery power to last throughout the school day.


From Acceptable Use Policy:


Violation of any of the rules from the Acceptable Use polices could result in disciplinary sanctions, including confiscation of device, restriction of network access, loss of co-curricular eligibility, suspension from school honor and service organizations, and suspension or expulsion from school.  It is important to know that La Salle’s code of conduct extends year round, to off campus activity as well as beyond the school day.  The expectation is that community members will contribute to a stable and productive computing environment using good and ethical judgment at all times.

Next:  Answer some questions about Digital Citizenship and the Acceptable Use Policy



 6.  Digital Responsibilities and Cyberbullying


1 Match the roles that different people play in cyberbullying situations.Matching – 1 point
· 2 Online bullying tends to escalate when multiple people become involved in the cruelty or bullying.
True/False – 1 point
· 3 All of these are things a TARGET should do if they are being bullied, except:Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 4 What advice would you give someone to convince them to be upstanding?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective
· 5 You don’t have to register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management (MDM) program in order to access the student wireless network.True/False – 1 point
· 6 Which of the following online activities will be given higher network priority over the others?Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 7 To maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during classtime.  Teachers may …Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 8 Creating, sending, accessing, uploading, downloading, or distributing offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material is prohibited at La Salle.True/False – 1 point
· 9 Taking or publishing photos or video of students or teachers is allowed.True/False – 1 point
10 What is the “Academic Mode” and how will you use it in class?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective


Next:  Module 3 Next Steps


iPad Online Modules – 5

3. Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time

Using the iPad for Learning

schoologyThe iPad is a great device for communicating, collaborating, and interacting with a variety of educational resources. Teachers will post class materials and resources on their Schoology page that you can access with the Schoology app.  You will download and access most of your textbooks on your iPad and use apps for instruction and review.   You will have 24/7 access to databases and eBooks and conduct Internet research whenever you need information. On the iPad you can create presentations to demonstrate your learning, type your papers, watch videos to learn new concepts and so much more.

Acceptable Use during Instructional Time

instructionalTo maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during class time.  Teachers will direct you when it is appropriate to use your iPad and when they want you to put it away.

We understand that it will be tempting to want to check your email, access social networks, or even play games when you have an iPad at your fingertips all the time. Our job at La Salle is to help you understand when that is appropriate and when you need to focus on academics.

Teachers or administrators may:

  1. Ask you to close apps that are not needed in class.
  2. Spot check to make sure you are using the appropriate resources.
  3. View or control your website usage using Teacher View.
  4. Limit the use of the camera, social networks, games, videos, email, etc.
  5. Ask all students to put their devices away.

According to the AUP, students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member. Even though you own your device, you do not have the right to display apps, music, movies, games or images that violate school policies while you are at school or attending school events.

“Academic Mode”

iPads are often used for recreational purposes, but in a 1:1 environment or when studying at home, it’s necessary to avoid the potential for distraction and focus on whatever task is at hand. Try to have a new mindset that iPads are treated as tools for learning, and not just devices for entertainment.

Challenge yourself to be fully present in class, during lunch and when doing homework. Avoid the temptation to go online, check your Facebook status or message your friends. Determine set times when you are going to access social networks.

Students should place their iPads in “Academic Mode” when they come into class or when completing homework. Academic Mode means:

  • Only needed academic files and applications are open or visible on your iPad.  Avoid having distracting applications visible while working on schoolwork.  This includes any non-academic applications, websites or notifications such as:  social media, messaging, games, news or email.
  • Turn off sounds and disable notifications or alerts.

To help yourself avoid distractions, temporarily turn off Wi-Fi when working with local files like textbooks, writing a paper or creating a presentation.  Be in charge of your online usage.

Next:  Be Respectful To Community Members

4. Be Respectful to Community Members

With 24/7 access, some students might use technology in inappropriate ways. Online cruelty, also referred to as cyberbullying, takes place whenever someone uses digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone else, often repeatedly.  People post things online that they wouldn’t say in person.

In this video from Common Sense Media, a teenage boy discusses the prevalence of saying hurtful things online and the impact those comments had on a particular friend. 

Is Ricardo is a cyberbully? He said he was just joking around. Ricardo is probably considered a cyberbully because he openly criticizes people online. On the other hand, we do not know how mean his comments were, and if he might change his behavior in the future. One of the issues with cyberbullying is the scale and the fact that it is public. Information generally travels faster and reaches more people on the Internet than offline, and this fact may make the impact harsher.

Ricardo thinks that harassing others on Internet, rather than in person, appeals to some teenagers because they can’t be attacked back physically.  People may cyberbully online because they do not have to face their target and can “hide” behind their computers. On the other hand, conflicts that start online often go offline at some point.

Have you ever encountered online cruelty? How do you think someone might feel after being the target of it?

Targets of online cruelty may feel they can be bombarded with negative comments at any time, anywhere. And when more offenders join in the online cruelty, the situation gets even worse. Watch this video and place yourself in Stacey’s shoes.

Who was involved in the story and what roles did they play?

  • Target: Stacey, whose intentions are misunderstood and who feels beaten down by being picked on offline and online
  • Offenders: The girl who misunderstood Stacey’s intent, as well as her friends who led the cruel online behavior
  • Bystanders: All of the people who might have stepped in but did not, including Stacey’s cousin and others at school or online
  • Upstander: Stacey’s mom, who empathized with Stacey and encouraged her to seek help from the school

As Stacey says, most of the comments were made anonymously and from “miles away.” It may be easier for offenders to be cruel when they are not face to face with their target. It’s easy for online cruelty to spread quickly, both because of the technology and because of the herd mentality.

Targets and Upstanders Can De-escalate Online Cruelty

You can make a difference — even if you are being targeted.  Here are a few ideas:


  • Ignore and block the bully. Offenders often want attention. Take it away and they may give up.
  • Save the evidence. You may need it later for documentation.
  • Change your privacy settings. Allow only people you trust to see or comment on your pages.
  • Tell trusted friends and adults. Create a support network.

Don’t just ignore cyberbullying if you see it happening at La Salle.  Be an Upstander!


  • Stand up to the offender when appropriate. If you see something negative, say something. Make it clear that you think online cruelty is wrong, and tell the offender to back off. (It may be easier to do this if you have good standing with the offender.)
  • Point out the bully’s motivation to the target. Comfort the target by explaining that many offenders act cruelly just to gain control, power, or status.
  • Help the target advocate. Help the target find friends and school leaders who can help de-escalate the situation. It’s easier to stand up to cruelty when you are not alone.

Bystanders may hesitate to get involved in a cyberbullying situation because they don’t want to become targets themselves. Put yourself in the target’s shoes. What would it feel like if nobody wanted to help you out when you needed it most? You can show support in many ways, even simply by listening to a target about his or her experience.

Next: School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy


iPad Online Modules – 4


1. Introduction: Acceptable Use Policy

The mobile learning program at La Salle provides tools and resources for a 21st century education, empowering you to maximize your potential in preparatioacceptableusen for college and the workplace. Using iPads offers an opportunity for you to enhance your overall learning experience by providing access to learn anytime, anywhere –in or out of the classroom.

This 1:1 personalized learning also promotes responsible use in today’s current technological era. Understanding and following the acceptable use policy ensures that each student gains the full benefits of La Salle’s academic accessibility.

The following modules will cover the basics of La Salle’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).  Every student will be required to have a copy of AUP loaded on their iPad, accessible through iBooks.

Download the AUP Policy here on your iPad, then use “Open In iBooks” and open the pdf file in iBooks. We will review this document during the On-Campus iPad Bootcamp and during Falcon Formation classes throughout the school year.

Next:  Filtered Internet Access


2. Filtered Internet Access

When you bring your iPad to school you will be required to register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management (MDM) program.  You will use a dedicated La Salle wireless network just for students. At school, you will go to your wireless settings on your iPad, choose the designated La Salle student Wi-Fi and then sign in with your La Salle username and password in order to access and browse the Internet. This will be covered during the summer On Campus iPad Bootcamp).

By logging into the La Salle wireless network, you are accepting the terms of the Acceptable Use Policy.

Once on the La Salle wireless network, all users will have filtered Internet access (rated PG13). This means that some websites will NOT be available to you when you are on the school’s network.  Certain resources (e.g. Schoology, Google Drive, school databases) will have priority over user-selected websites.

selfserviceIf students remove La Salle’s MDM profile from their iPad, they will NOT be able to access the school network.  Students need to understand that the MDM program can block certain websites or allow teachers to view website usage through the Teacher View program when they are on the school network.  One benefit is that the MDM program can push out apps or eBooks to students through the Self-Service App.

If students have iPads equipped with 3G/4G capabilities, they must have their cellular network capabilities turned off while on the school grounds.

When you return home and access your own personal wireless network you will return to full Internet access.

Students who want Wi-Fi access on their phones or iPods will continue to use the Guest Network.

Next:  Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time


iPad Online Modules – 3

3.  Quiz: Student Responsibilities

1 Students are required to have a protective case for their iPad.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 2 Students must bring their iPads to school each day ….Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 3 Where is a good place to store your iPad during PE?Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 4 La Salle Prep will replace your personal iPad if it’s lost or stolen.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 5 If you accidentally leave your iPad at home, you will still be responsible for getting your class work completed as if you had your iPad present.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties

4. Optional Accessories

accessoriesIn addition to your iPad, you will probably want a set of headphones/ear buds (especially for World Language classes). You might also want to have a stylus for note taking and a keyboard for typing papers — but these are optional. You might want to use your iPad for a while before purchasing these items.

You will want to find a consistent place to store and care for your accessories. Unplug your headphones when not in use, as this provide an opportunity for breakage when you store the iPad.  Label all accessories with your full name.

Optional Accessories:

  1. Protective Case (is required) but neoprene sleeve or padded area in backpack is suggested
  2. Headphones or ear buds
  3. Keyboard
  4. Stylus


Next:  Acceptable Use


iPad Online Modules – 2

Taking Care of Your Mobile Device

Be Preparedbprepared

Being a good digital citizen and a responsible member of the La Salle Prep community means students come to school prepared to learn. Students must take good care of their iPads and bring them to school each day:

  • In good working condition.
  • In a protected case that meets the school’s requirements.
  • With sufficient storage available for school use.
  • With the appropriate apps and textbooks installed.
  • With the battery fully charged.

Be Carefulbecareful

It is expected that students will care for their iPad during use and transportation.  Students need to take ownership for his/her own digital property and should treat and use their iPads responsibly and appropriately.

  • Use an iPad case that covers the corners.
  • Clean your iPad with a soft cloth or consider using a screen protector.
  • Do not place heavy objects on the screen.
  • Store your iPad in a padded backpack or neoprene sleeve. Do not toss your backpack on the ground.
  • Avoid getting your iPad wet or leaving it in a hot car.

Be Securebesecure

La Salle Catholic College Preparatory takes no responsibility for stolen, lost or damaged iPads, including lost or corrupted data on the devices.  While school employees will help studentsidentify how to keep iPads secure, students will have the final responsibility for securing their personal iPad. This equipment is the personal property of the student/parent and is subject to inspection in accordance with the Acceptable Use Policy if found or confiscated.

  • Engrave your contact information on your iPad.  Label accessories with your name.
  • Lock your iPad in your locker when not using it.  Keep your locker locked.
  • Do not leave your iPad charging in an unsecure area.
  • Install the Find My iPad app on your device.
  • Keep your passcode private and do not lend your device to friends.
  • Backup up your data to a computer or iCloud.
  • Report your lost or stolen iPad to the school office immediately.

Members of The Tech Nest (La Salle’s student-run tech support group) created this video to remind you about some important tips for caring for your iPad. 

Next:  Check your understanding with a Responsibility Quiz


iPad Online Modules – 1

For our mobile learning 1:1 program rollout, we are asking our students to go through a series of online modules using Schoology to review digital citizenship and our Acceptable Use policy, guidelines for setting up their iPads, which apps to install, care and use of their iPads, etc.

This series of blog posts will share the material for the online modules.  Schoology provides us the opportunity to require students to work through the modules one at a time and they can’t advance until they’ve met the completion rules (super great feature for online learning!).


Online modules for mobile learning 1:1 program




These mobile learning modules on Schoology aim to provide La Salle Prep students with information about the Mobile Learning Initiative focusing on policies, guidelines and practical information about using your personal iPad at school.

These modules serve as curriculum to complement the responsibilities and rules listed in the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) outlined in the student handbook.  Students will be required to have a copy of the AUP downloaded on their iPad in iBooks.

The modules will cover three main areas:

  • Module 1:  Student Responsibilities
  • Module 2:  Acceptable Use
  • Module 3:  Next Steps

Next:  Learn how to take care of your iPad.



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