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Schoology Workflow on the iPad with Notability and Google Docs

A video to showcase how teachers at La Salle Prep are using Schoology with their students, including integration with Notability and Google Drive.

Schoology Workflow video – watch on YouTube

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8 Facets of Learning

A team of teachers and administrators at my school identified 8 FACETS of LEARNING as part of our 1:1 Mobile Learning Initiative where we feel that mobile devices could really impact student learning.  This is not an exhaustive list but represents how we need to really look beyond the iPad as a  consumer device and look for opportunities for content-creation, authentic learning experiences and collaborative projects. Focusing on the learning objective is essential when planning on using devices in your classroom.  The embedded presentation showcases a few of the ways that we plan for this focus.

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Photoshop video playlist

This is my collection of Photoshop editing videos that I use in my Multimedia/ Web Development class at La Salle Prep.  I find it very useful to make these screencast videos using Camtasia.  I use the videos to introduce the editing concepts in class and then the students use them for review whenever they need them.

This Photoshop playlist contains nine videos showcasing various editing techniques for Photoshop CS3.

Here are a few Photoshop CS3 tips:

  1. Use the Quick Selection tool (or marquee tools) to select a portion of an image and then apply the adjust layer to only that section.
  2. Adjustment Layer – An adjustment layer (Go to Layer / New Adjustment Layer) applies color and tonal adjustments to your image without permanently changing pixel values.  The adjustment layer sits on top of your image in the Layers Panel.  Paint on the adjustment layer’s image mask (with the black paintbrush) to apply an adjustment to part of an image (for example:  to allow the color to see through).
  3. Layer Effects & Styles (fx) – You can add a variety of effects—such as drop shadows, glows, strokes (outlines) and bevels—that change the appearance of a layer’s contents.  Go to Layer  / Layer Style and choose the appropriate effect OR use the (fx) icon on the bottom of the layers panel. You can apply layer effect to images or text.
  4. Filters – You can use filters to clean up or retouch your photos, apply special art effects that give your image the appearance of a sketch or impressionistic painting, or create unique transformations using distortions and lighting effects.  Go to Filter / Filter Gallery and choose the desired filter.  You can adjust the features of the filter by  using the slider bars in the panel.  Smart Filters applied to Smart Objectslets you use filters non-destructively & can be readjusted anytime.
  5. Mask – Select the portion of image with the Quick Selection tool or marquee and then go to Layer / Layer Mask and choose Hide All to hide everything except the selection.  This is a non-destructive to to cut out or MASK a portion of an image.  You can also use the mask icon at the bottom of the Layers panel.
  6. Because all of these adjustments are non-destructive you can into the layers panel and temporarily hide them or remove them if you want.
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Mobile Learning Parent Meeting

An essential part to rolling out any 1:1 mobile learning initiative is to get your parent community involved and provide opportunities to educate parents and answer any questions or concerns.  At La Salle Prep we put together a parent information night last Spring to present an overview of how mobile devices will impact student learning, plans for digital citizenship lessons, updates on infrastructure, information about eTextbooks, etc.

Parents had a choice to attend two of four sessions:

I presented on eBooks and Digital Resources.  We decided to attempt to convert most paper textbooks to digital versions.  Every department conducted a lengthy review of textbooks and chose the best for their subjects.  At this point many textbook companies aren’t quite ready to offer every textbook in digital format.  We also were looking for stand alone textbooks vs. purchasing subscriptions that we needed to manage.

Here are some presentation notes:

eTextbooks:  An important aspect of La Salle’s 1:1 mobile learning program

iBooksLa Salle Prep is committed to securing eTextbooks for most classes next year so that students will be able to use their iPads for course materials.  Teachers have spent considerable time this school year reviewing and selecting eTextbook options for their classes.  These textbooks are from a variety of different publishers and available in various formats:  iBooks (iTunes store), Kno Textbooks, Pearson eText, non-fiction books purchased with Kindle app for iPad or Google Play Store, and eTextbooks by specific publishers.

Once the student schedules are complete in early summer and shared with families, La Salle will make the textbook list available on the La Salle Prep website.  This listing will include: course, title, author, price, format and a direct link of where to purchase the eTextbook. iBooks can be purchased in the iTunes App Store.  Families can purchase an iTunes gift card for their child and load the value onto an iTunes account to purchase iBooks and apps.  Families might consider a family iTunes account to purchase eTextbooks to share books with siblings but then each individual child can have their own iTunes account for personal use. Families will need to coordinate credit card purchases with their son/daughter for books that need to be purchased by specific publishers, Kindle store (Amazon) or the Google Play store.

Most textbooks fall between the $15 – $25 range except for some of the specialty AP eTextbooks which are priced more like college-level textbooks. There is no need to purchase the materials too early.  It is better to wait until the student’s schedule has been confirmed before purchasing books because you are buying them direct from the publishers. La Salle Prep will not be responsible for refunds if your child changes classes.

The La Salle Prep Library has invested in numerous digital resources to support the 1:1 mobile learning initiative.  This includes digital databases, non-fiction and reference eBooks, links to free Project Gutenburg ebooks in ourDestiny Library catalog, video tutorials for specific apps and iPad procedures, and more.  Many teachers will also provide course materials through Schoology, use Google Apps for productivity tools or may require specific apps for class.

We are making every effort to assist students and families with the transition to a mobile learning environment.  All students will be required to complete Online Modules (posted in Schoology) that will cover basic use and care of an iPad, digital citizenship, rights and responsibilities.  The modules will also cover steps students should take to prepare their iPad for the first day of school.  These modules will be available beginning in early June.

All students will also be required to attend a 3 hour On-Campus Bootcamp in August.  Sign ups for iPad bootcamps will begin online on May 16th.  Students should bring their iPad to the bootcamp to register their device with La Salle’s mobile device management system and set up appropriate accounts like email, Schoology, Google Apps,etc.

Many students have commented that they are looking forward to having all of their textbooks on one device and they won’t have to carry around such a heavy backpack.

Using eTextbooks is an important component to the success of our 1:1 mobile learning program.  Please contact Mario De Ieso mdeieso@lsprep.org if you have further questions.

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iPad Online Modules – 7

MODULE 3:  NEXT STEPS

1. On Campus Bootcamp

bootcampAll students (incoming 9th-12th) are required to attend a 3 hour On-Campus Bootcamp in August held in the La Salle Library.

Sign ups for On-Campus bootcamps will begin online on May 16th at 8am.  Click HERE if you have not signed up for a bootcamp.  

After registering for your bootcamp you will receive a confirmation email and certificate. Bring your certificate to the On Campus Bootcamp indicating your completion of the Online Module.

If you need to change your bootcamp or cannot attend one of the sessions, please contact Mrs. Colette Cassinelli (library@lsprep.org).

Students should bring their iPad to the bootcamp to register their device with La Salle’s mobile device management system and set up appropriate accounts like email, Schoology, Google Apps, etc.

Next:  Apple ID & iTunes Account

2. Apple ID & iTunes Account

APPLE ID:

appleidStudents will be required to have an Apple ID and dedicated iTunes account in order to download apps and receive content provided by the school through the Mobile Device Management program.

An Apple ID is a user name you use for everything you do with Apple. Creating an account for an Apple service, such as the iTunes Store or the App Store, creates an Apple ID.  You don’t have to create a new account for each service—just use your Apple ID. From FAQ about Apple ID.

OPTIONS:

  1. Each student signs up for their own iTunes account and creates an unique Apple ID for purchasing apps, books, etc.  Consider using your school email address (username@lshigh.org) and/or your own personal email address for this account.  You can use an existing Apple ID for your iPad but it will probably require you to add a credit card to your account (see below).
  2. Create a family iTunes account for major purchases such as textbooks.  Use the family Apple ID for purchases and register a credit card but then log out of that account and have each student log in with their own Apple ID to download free apps or backup their files.  This might be helpful for families that have multiple children at La Salle and plan on sharing textbooks from year to year.
  3. Loading iTunes giftcards onto an iTunes account is a great way for students to purchase books in the iBooks store or apps in the iTunes app store.  Please note that not all textbooks will be located in the iBooks store.

Here is a helpful tip for new iTunes account users on the iPad:  Create an Apple ID in the application store without having to use any form of payment method:

1. First download any FREE application inside the store on any Apple device without an account.

2. Once the pop up window opens, hit ‘CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT.’

3. Make sure you use a fresh, new email that you have not yet attempted to use prior to this explanation (this might be a good time to create an account with your lshigh.org account.)

4. Fill in the required fields to continue on to the second page.

5. Once you are on the page that asks for your payment information, on the top section, grouped in under the credit cards, there will be an option labled ‘NONE.’ Select it, and fill in your billing information.

6.  Unfortunately, this option is NOT available for exisiting accounts. Contact iTunes Support for assistance.

More information about Apple ID at:  http://www.apple.com/support/appleid/

Next:  Things To Do Before The On-Campus Bootcamp

3. Things To Do Before the On-Campus Bootcamp

TO DO:

checklistThe On-Campus bootcamp is a 3-hour workshop and we want to make the best use of our time.  Please complete the following steps before attending your selected session.

  1. Purchase your iPad and protective cover and bring it to bootcamp.  You will register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management program during the bootcamp.
  2. Create an Apple ID and be able to access the iTunes App store and iBooks store.  Make sure you know your password so you can download apps at the On-Campus bootcamp.
  3. Download the following apps that we will use during the bootcamp workshop:
    1. Schoology – If you are a current La Salle student, practice logging in with your username and password.  New and incoming students will receive credentials in the mail this summer.  We will set up your profile, notifications, and check your time-zone during the bootcamp.
    2. Google Drive – La Salle Prep is a Google Apps for Education school. We will set up your email, calendar, and Drive folders during one of the sessions.
    3. PowerSchool for Students – This is our grade reporting software.  It won’t be useful until the school year starts but make sure you have a copy before then.
    4. iBooks – App for reading iBook textbooks or pdf files.  We’ll create collections in iBooks for your files.
    5. Destiny Quest – This app that allows you to access the online Library catalog and collection of eBooks.  We will set up your username and password.
    6. Find My iPhone – This app works for any IOS device is helpful for locating misplaced devices.  Students will sign-in with their Apple ID using iCloud to practice locating their device.
    7. i-nigma – This is a QR code reader that we will use during the Bootcamp.
    8. Optional:  Have an iTunes gift card loaded onto your account so you can practice purchasing apps or iBooks.
    9. Optional:  These are some FREE apps recommended by La Salle Teachers:GaragebandiTunes U,  EduCreationsHaiku Deck,Socrative Student,FlipboardPreziPhonto and Pic Stitch.  Teachers will list additional paid apps needed with the textbook list or with their course syllabus.
  4. Fill out the form on the next page indicating you have completed the Online Modules.  A certificate will be emailed to you.  Print it out and bring it to the On-Campus Bootcamp to show that you have met this requirement.

PLEASE NOTE:  We encourage you to WAIT to purchase any textbooks until you are sure that you will be enrolled in the course.  

Once the student schedules are complete in early summer and shared with families, La Salle will make the textbook list available on the La Salle Prep website.  This listing will include: course, title, author, price, format and a direct link of where to purchase the eTextbook. 

Most textbooks fall between the $15 – $25 range except for some of the specialty AP eTextbooks that are priced more like college-level textbooks. There is no need to purchase the materials too early.  It is better to wait until the student’s schedule has been confirmed before purchasing books because you are buying them direct from the publishers. La Salle Prep will not be responsible for refunds if your child changes classes.

Next:  Congratulations!

4. Congratulations!

Congratulations!  You have completed your Online Modules.  Fill out this form and a certificate will be emailed to you indicating your completion.  Print and bring your certificate to the On-Campus Bootcamp to show you have met this requirement.

We will see you at the On-Campus Bootcamp in August!

Click here if you cannot see the form

 

 

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iPad Online Modules – 6

5. School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

At La Salle we want to be clear about our expectations with or without technology.  Below are some typical school scenarios and the related rules from the Acceptable Use Policy.  If you haven’t downloaded and read the Acceptable Use Policy, you should do that now.

Scenario #1:  A student finds an off-color cartoon that makes fun of people’s race or sexual orientation on Tumbler and posts it on Schoology for all to see.

Students may not create, send, access, upload, download, or distribute offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material.

Scenario #2:  A girl uses iMessage on her iPad to text her friend during class to discuss the upcoming Prom.

The use of social networks not authorized by the teacher for academic use is prohibited.

 

Scenario #3:  A boy finds someone’s iPad in the Library and attempts to log onto their account to see their files.

Gaining or attempting to gain access to other students’ or staff members’ accounts, files, and/or data is not allowed.

 

Scenario #4:  A student thinks it’s funny to photograph or videotape their teacher teaching a lesson and sends it to their classmates.

Publishing identifiable photographs or video of students, faculty, staff or administration without appropriate or prior written consent is prohibited.

 

Scenario #5:  A student is posting messages to Facebook during class and the teacher asks them to hand over their iPad.

Students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member.

 

Scenario #6:  A girl writes an essay on Google Docs and shares her work with a friend who downloads a copy and turns it in as her own work.

Plagiarizing academic materials, or otherwise is a violation of La Salle’s academic integrity policy.

 

Scenario #7:  A student creates a Twitter account using La Salle’s name and/or logo to post comments about what students wear to school.

Use of La Salle’s name, logo or identity in a way that negatively impacts the school’s reputation is prohibited.

 

Scenario #8:  A student brings their iPad to school but then realizes it has no battery left and cannot access the required textbook or complete the in-class iPad activity.

Students are to fully charge their iPad each night to ensure sufficient battery power to last throughout the school day.

 

From Acceptable Use Policy:

 

Violation of any of the rules from the Acceptable Use polices could result in disciplinary sanctions, including confiscation of device, restriction of network access, loss of co-curricular eligibility, suspension from school honor and service organizations, and suspension or expulsion from school.  It is important to know that La Salle’s code of conduct extends year round, to off campus activity as well as beyond the school day.  The expectation is that community members will contribute to a stable and productive computing environment using good and ethical judgment at all times.

Next:  Answer some questions about Digital Citizenship and the Acceptable Use Policy

 

 

 6.  Digital Responsibilities and Cyberbullying

 

1 Match the roles that different people play in cyberbullying situations.Matching – 1 point
· 2 Online bullying tends to escalate when multiple people become involved in the cruelty or bullying.
True/False – 1 point
· 3 All of these are things a TARGET should do if they are being bullied, except:Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 4 What advice would you give someone to convince them to be upstanding?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective
· 5 You don’t have to register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management (MDM) program in order to access the student wireless network.True/False – 1 point
· 6 Which of the following online activities will be given higher network priority over the others?Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 7 To maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during classtime.  Teachers may …Multiple Choice – 1 point
· 8 Creating, sending, accessing, uploading, downloading, or distributing offensive, profane, threatening, pornographic, obscene, or sexually explicit material is prohibited at La Salle.True/False – 1 point
· 9 Taking or publishing photos or video of students or teachers is allowed.True/False – 1 point
10 What is the “Academic Mode” and how will you use it in class?Short-Answer/Essay Question – 0 points – Subjective

 

Next:  Module 3 Next Steps

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iPad Online Modules – 5

3. Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time

Using the iPad for Learning

schoologyThe iPad is a great device for communicating, collaborating, and interacting with a variety of educational resources. Teachers will post class materials and resources on their Schoology page that you can access with the Schoology app.  You will download and access most of your textbooks on your iPad and use apps for instruction and review.   You will have 24/7 access to databases and eBooks and conduct Internet research whenever you need information. On the iPad you can create presentations to demonstrate your learning, type your papers, watch videos to learn new concepts and so much more.

Acceptable Use during Instructional Time

instructionalTo maintain the integrity of the learning environment during the school day students need to use their iPads for academic purposes during class time.  Teachers will direct you when it is appropriate to use your iPad and when they want you to put it away.

We understand that it will be tempting to want to check your email, access social networks, or even play games when you have an iPad at your fingertips all the time. Our job at La Salle is to help you understand when that is appropriate and when you need to focus on academics.

Teachers or administrators may:

  1. Ask you to close apps that are not needed in class.
  2. Spot check to make sure you are using the appropriate resources.
  3. View or control your website usage using Teacher View.
  4. Limit the use of the camera, social networks, games, videos, email, etc.
  5. Ask all students to put their devices away.

According to the AUP, students’ iPads are subject to inspection at the discretion of a teacher or staff member. Even though you own your device, you do not have the right to display apps, music, movies, games or images that violate school policies while you are at school or attending school events.

“Academic Mode”

iPads are often used for recreational purposes, but in a 1:1 environment or when studying at home, it’s necessary to avoid the potential for distraction and focus on whatever task is at hand. Try to have a new mindset that iPads are treated as tools for learning, and not just devices for entertainment.

Challenge yourself to be fully present in class, during lunch and when doing homework. Avoid the temptation to go online, check your Facebook status or message your friends. Determine set times when you are going to access social networks.

Students should place their iPads in “Academic Mode” when they come into class or when completing homework. Academic Mode means:

  • Only needed academic files and applications are open or visible on your iPad.  Avoid having distracting applications visible while working on schoolwork.  This includes any non-academic applications, websites or notifications such as:  social media, messaging, games, news or email.
  • Turn off sounds and disable notifications or alerts.

To help yourself avoid distractions, temporarily turn off Wi-Fi when working with local files like textbooks, writing a paper or creating a presentation.  Be in charge of your online usage.

Next:  Be Respectful To Community Members

4. Be Respectful to Community Members

With 24/7 access, some students might use technology in inappropriate ways. Online cruelty, also referred to as cyberbullying, takes place whenever someone uses digital media tools such as the Internet and cell phones to deliberately upset or harass someone else, often repeatedly.  People post things online that they wouldn’t say in person.

In this video from Common Sense Media, a teenage boy discusses the prevalence of saying hurtful things online and the impact those comments had on a particular friend.

http://youtu.be/YvpcWAZJzoY 

Is Ricardo is a cyberbully? He said he was just joking around. Ricardo is probably considered a cyberbully because he openly criticizes people online. On the other hand, we do not know how mean his comments were, and if he might change his behavior in the future. One of the issues with cyberbullying is the scale and the fact that it is public. Information generally travels faster and reaches more people on the Internet than offline, and this fact may make the impact harsher.

Ricardo thinks that harassing others on Internet, rather than in person, appeals to some teenagers because they can’t be attacked back physically.  People may cyberbully online because they do not have to face their target and can “hide” behind their computers. On the other hand, conflicts that start online often go offline at some point.

Have you ever encountered online cruelty? How do you think someone might feel after being the target of it?

Targets of online cruelty may feel they can be bombarded with negative comments at any time, anywhere. And when more offenders join in the online cruelty, the situation gets even worse. Watch this video and place yourself in Stacey’s shoes.

http://youtu.be/w4ugP_eQUR8

Who was involved in the story and what roles did they play?

  • Target: Stacey, whose intentions are misunderstood and who feels beaten down by being picked on offline and online
  • Offenders: The girl who misunderstood Stacey’s intent, as well as her friends who led the cruel online behavior
  • Bystanders: All of the people who might have stepped in but did not, including Stacey’s cousin and others at school or online
  • Upstander: Stacey’s mom, who empathized with Stacey and encouraged her to seek help from the school

As Stacey says, most of the comments were made anonymously and from “miles away.” It may be easier for offenders to be cruel when they are not face to face with their target. It’s easy for online cruelty to spread quickly, both because of the technology and because of the herd mentality.

Targets and Upstanders Can De-escalate Online Cruelty

You can make a difference — even if you are being targeted.  Here are a few ideas:

Targets:

  • Ignore and block the bully. Offenders often want attention. Take it away and they may give up.
  • Save the evidence. You may need it later for documentation.
  • Change your privacy settings. Allow only people you trust to see or comment on your pages.
  • Tell trusted friends and adults. Create a support network.

Don’t just ignore cyberbullying if you see it happening at La Salle.  Be an Upstander!

Upstanders:

  • Stand up to the offender when appropriate. If you see something negative, say something. Make it clear that you think online cruelty is wrong, and tell the offender to back off. (It may be easier to do this if you have good standing with the offender.)
  • Point out the bully’s motivation to the target. Comfort the target by explaining that many offenders act cruelly just to gain control, power, or status.
  • Help the target advocate. Help the target find friends and school leaders who can help de-escalate the situation. It’s easier to stand up to cruelty when you are not alone.

Bystanders may hesitate to get involved in a cyberbullying situation because they don’t want to become targets themselves. Put yourself in the target’s shoes. What would it feel like if nobody wanted to help you out when you needed it most? You can show support in many ways, even simply by listening to a target about his or her experience.

Next: School Scenarios and the Acceptable Use Policy

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iPad Online Modules – 4

MODULE 2: ACCEPTABLE USE

1. Introduction: Acceptable Use Policy

The mobile learning program at La Salle provides tools and resources for a 21st century education, empowering you to maximize your potential in preparatioacceptableusen for college and the workplace. Using iPads offers an opportunity for you to enhance your overall learning experience by providing access to learn anytime, anywhere –in or out of the classroom.

This 1:1 personalized learning also promotes responsible use in today’s current technological era. Understanding and following the acceptable use policy ensures that each student gains the full benefits of La Salle’s academic accessibility.

The following modules will cover the basics of La Salle’s Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).  Every student will be required to have a copy of AUP loaded on their iPad, accessible through iBooks.

Download the AUP Policy here on your iPad, then use “Open In iBooks” and open the pdf file in iBooks. We will review this document during the On-Campus iPad Bootcamp and during Falcon Formation classes throughout the school year.

Next:  Filtered Internet Access

 

2. Filtered Internet Access

When you bring your iPad to school you will be required to register your device with La Salle’s Mobile Device Management (MDM) program.  You will use a dedicated La Salle wireless network just for students. At school, you will go to your wireless settings on your iPad, choose the designated La Salle student Wi-Fi and then sign in with your La Salle username and password in order to access and browse the Internet. This will be covered during the summer On Campus iPad Bootcamp).

By logging into the La Salle wireless network, you are accepting the terms of the Acceptable Use Policy.

Once on the La Salle wireless network, all users will have filtered Internet access (rated PG13). This means that some websites will NOT be available to you when you are on the school’s network.  Certain resources (e.g. Schoology, Google Drive, school databases) will have priority over user-selected websites.

selfserviceIf students remove La Salle’s MDM profile from their iPad, they will NOT be able to access the school network.  Students need to understand that the MDM program can block certain websites or allow teachers to view website usage through the Teacher View program when they are on the school network.  One benefit is that the MDM program can push out apps or eBooks to students through the Self-Service App.

If students have iPads equipped with 3G/4G capabilities, they must have their cellular network capabilities turned off while on the school grounds.

When you return home and access your own personal wireless network you will return to full Internet access.

Students who want Wi-Fi access on their phones or iPods will continue to use the Guest Network.

Next:  Using Mobile Devices during Instructional Time

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iPad Online Modules – 3

3.  Quiz: Student Responsibilities

1 Students are required to have a protective case for their iPad.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 2 Students must bring their iPads to school each day ….Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 3 Where is a good place to store your iPad during PE?Multiple Choice – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 4 La Salle Prep will replace your personal iPad if it’s lost or stolen.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties
· 5 If you accidentally leave your iPad at home, you will still be responsible for getting your class work completed as if you had your iPad present.True/False – 1 point –  Student Responsibilties

4. Optional Accessories

accessoriesIn addition to your iPad, you will probably want a set of headphones/ear buds (especially for World Language classes). You might also want to have a stylus for note taking and a keyboard for typing papers — but these are optional. You might want to use your iPad for a while before purchasing these items.

You will want to find a consistent place to store and care for your accessories. Unplug your headphones when not in use, as this provide an opportunity for breakage when you store the iPad.  Label all accessories with your full name.

Optional Accessories:

  1. Protective Case (is required) but neoprene sleeve or padded area in backpack is suggested
  2. Headphones or ear buds
  3. Keyboard
  4. Stylus

 

Next:  Acceptable Use

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iPad Online Modules – 2

Taking Care of Your Mobile Device

Be Preparedbprepared

Being a good digital citizen and a responsible member of the La Salle Prep community means students come to school prepared to learn. Students must take good care of their iPads and bring them to school each day:

  • In good working condition.
  • In a protected case that meets the school’s requirements.
  • With sufficient storage available for school use.
  • With the appropriate apps and textbooks installed.
  • With the battery fully charged.

Be Carefulbecareful

It is expected that students will care for their iPad during use and transportation.  Students need to take ownership for his/her own digital property and should treat and use their iPads responsibly and appropriately.

  • Use an iPad case that covers the corners.
  • Clean your iPad with a soft cloth or consider using a screen protector.
  • Do not place heavy objects on the screen.
  • Store your iPad in a padded backpack or neoprene sleeve. Do not toss your backpack on the ground.
  • Avoid getting your iPad wet or leaving it in a hot car.

Be Securebesecure

La Salle Catholic College Preparatory takes no responsibility for stolen, lost or damaged iPads, including lost or corrupted data on the devices.  While school employees will help studentsidentify how to keep iPads secure, students will have the final responsibility for securing their personal iPad. This equipment is the personal property of the student/parent and is subject to inspection in accordance with the Acceptable Use Policy if found or confiscated.

  • Engrave your contact information on your iPad.  Label accessories with your name.
  • Lock your iPad in your locker when not using it.  Keep your locker locked.
  • Do not leave your iPad charging in an unsecure area.
  • Install the Find My iPad app on your device.
  • Keep your passcode private and do not lend your device to friends.
  • Backup up your data to a computer or iCloud.
  • Report your lost or stolen iPad to the school office immediately.

Members of The Tech Nest (La Salle’s student-run tech support group) created this video to remind you about some important tips for caring for your iPad.

http://youtu.be/vII4yg2P3iA 

Next:  Check your understanding with a Responsibility Quiz

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iPad Online Modules – 1

For our mobile learning 1:1 program rollout, we are asking our students to go through a series of online modules using Schoology to review digital citizenship and our Acceptable Use policy, guidelines for setting up their iPads, which apps to install, care and use of their iPads, etc.

This series of blog posts will share the material for the online modules.  Schoology provides us the opportunity to require students to work through the modules one at a time and they can’t advance until they’ve met the completion rules (super great feature for online learning!).

Schoology

Online modules for mobile learning 1:1 program


 

MODULE 1: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Welcome

These mobile learning modules on Schoology aim to provide La Salle Prep students with information about the Mobile Learning Initiative focusing on policies, guidelines and practical information about using your personal iPad at school.

These modules serve as curriculum to complement the responsibilities and rules listed in the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) outlined in the student handbook.  Students will be required to have a copy of the AUP downloaded on their iPad in iBooks.

The modules will cover three main areas:

  • Module 1:  Student Responsibilities
  • Module 2:  Acceptable Use
  • Module 3:  Next Steps

Next:  Learn how to take care of your iPad.

 

 

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Presenting & Archiving

Presentation and Archiving

Presentation and archiving tools allow students to present projects to the instructor, to the class, or to the general public. Communication tools also factor heavily into this phase of project-based collaborative learning.  Oftentimes the co-creation tool will also be used as the presentation tool but there are some collaborative technology tools that are mainly used for sharing or downloading the presentation.

Presentations:SlideShare

SlideShare – Teachers or students can upload documents and presentations to SlideShare to share ideas, conduct research, connect with others or make their presentation public. Anyone can view presentations & documents on topics that interest them, download them and reuse or remix for their own work.

Google Slides – Students can create beautiful slides with the presentation editor, which supports things like embedded videos, animations and dynamic slide transitions. Publish the presentations on the web so anyone can view them, or share them with a chosen group of users.  (Updated note:  If you have previously published Google Presentations using the “old” Google Docs – before the transition to Google Drive – you might want to go through and make sure that they are still marked as “published to the web” otherwise users may not be able to view your presentations.)  Users can also upload presentations made with PowerPoint or Keynote into Google Slides but some formatting or animations may be lost.

VoiceThread:  A VoiceThread is a collaborative, multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos and allows people to navigate slides and leave comments in 5 ways – using voice through a Facebook Fan Page (with a mic or telephone), text, audio file, or video (via a webcam). VoiceThread is a perfect platform to use when you want to share presentations using an asynchronous method. Users can doodle while commenting, use multiple identities, and pick which comments are shown through moderation. VoiceThreads can even be embedded to show and receive comments on other websites.  K-16 VoiceThread examples.

Prezi:  Prezi is a virtual whiteboard that transforms presentations where images and words work together to present an idea or lesson.  With Prezi Meeting, teams can collaborate live or simply present prezis with up to 10 people in a prezi at one time. Prezi Meeting is included in all license types.

Haiku Deck (iPad app) and the newly updated Haiku Deck Web enables anyone to create beautiful slide presentations.  Haiku Deck intentionally limits how much text that you can put on each of your slides and it helps you find Creative Commons licensed images for your presentations. When you type a word or words on your slides you can have Haiku Deck search for images for you. The images that Haiku Deck serves up are large enough to completely fill your slide. You can also upload your own images from your iPad or import images from Instagram and Facebook.  Another excellent presentation app is Keynote.

 


Websites:

Students can build project sites without writing a single line of code using Google Sites. It’s as easy as writing a document and to save time, teachers can provide students with pre-built templates. Students can present their content and embed in all sorts of gadgets from documents to videos to images to shared calendars and more.  Student or teacher-created websites are also great for archiving student projects from year to year.

Some other easy website creation tools are:  WixWeebly for EducationYola and Webs.


Jing

Screencasting:  A screencast is a digital recording (movie) that captures actions taking place on a computer desktop or tablet device.  Screencasting is another asynchronous platform for creating and sharing presentations or tutorials.  The movies can be embedded or shared by the link.  Screencasts are very popular with the “flipped classroom” or “reverse instruction” programs.

There a lot of free apps out on the web for screencasting, most of which also have paid versions that provide more capabilities.  Screencast-O-Matic was one of the first screencasting tools published and is still around (and kept up to date).  It works with both the Mac and the PC and requires no installation.  The same folks who make Camtasia (paid software) make Jing – a popular app that lets you easily capture screen activity, record voice-over, and publish clips up to 5 minutes long. Screenr is another popular, free, web-based screencasting tool that works with the Mac and PC.

 


Miscellaneous publishing or presentation tools:

  • Animoto (Education edition) is an easy way to create and share videos. The online video maker turns your photos, video clips and music into video in minutes.
  • Glogster EDU allows students to combine images, video, music, photos and audio to create multimedia pages. Glogs can be embedded into any webpage.
  • Issuu and Scribd are digital publishing platforms of user-created magazines, catalogs, and newspapers.
  • Museum Box provides the tools for students to build up an argument or description of an event, person or historical period by placing items in a virtual box. You can add text, images, video and sound to the side of the cubes.
  • iBooks Author is a Mac app that allows anyone to create multi-touch textbooks or books to be viewed on the iPad.
  • Snapguide is a free iOS app and web service for those that want to create and share step-by-step “how to guides.”
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Consensus Building & Polling Tools

Consensus Building

Consensus-building tools help participants narrow and refine proposed solutions of a project.  They are also useful in facilitating the two key requirements for reaching agreements in a work group setting by identifying and understanding issues and resolving conflicts. Teachers and students can facilitate consensus building through group discussions and polling.

Many of the ideation tools also can be used to build consensus.  Once the initial ideas are presented then through a process of discussion and elimination, ideas can be narrowed down and agreed upon.  Oftentimes students need time and opportunity to leave their comments so everyone can be  heard before a decision can be made.  Ideation and consensus often happen at the same time but separating them gives introverts time to process the ideas and comment.

Diagrams: Many of the collaborative technology tools have the ability to create graphic organizers to scaffold decision-making – like a Venn Diagram or flowchart.  Google Docs or Google Drawings has built in templates of some common diagrams or you can create your own. Students can edit drawings online or invite others to view edits in real time.  Students can chat with others who are editing a drawing right within the drawings editor to build consensus.  The drawings can then be published online or embedded in other Google programs so all can see the results.

PadletPadlet (formally known as Wallwisher) is another brainstorming tool that can be used for ideation but also for consensus making.  The ability to leave notes with messages and then move and organize them is very easy for younger students to understand and use and perfect for quick brainstorming & decision making in the classroom.  You do not need a Wallwisher account to create or post on a wall but if you create a wall without logging in or signing up, you may be unable to edit the wall after 24 hours but it will still be available to view.  Wallwisher does have some other interesting features like the ability to use RSS to follow the posts being made, add Multimedia within the notes, moderate the comments being made, or share by an unique QR code created just for your page.

Another interesting tool for older students is Debategraph.  DebateGraph is a cloud-based service that offers individuals and communities a powerful way to learn about and deliberate and decide on complex issues. These graphs allow users to visualize, question, and evaluate all of the considerations that any member thinks may be relevant to the topic at hand – and facilitate intelligent, constructive dialogue within the community around those issues.

Google Moderator allows you to create a series about anything that you are interested in discussing with your class or school and open it up for people to submit questions, ideas, or suggestions.

 


 

Polling:  Using technology tools to poll audiences is easy and efficient and polling can be used to facilitate consensus or gather information.  You don’t need specialized audience response hardware to get feedback.  Poll Everywhere conducts surveys using the web, texting, or Twitter and can be used with a cellphone (SMS), smartphone, laptop, desktop, or tablet.  These polls can be made by teachers or students.  Poll Everywhere is free for audiences of 40 people or less and they offer paid plans for larger audiences and K-12 semester-long plans.  Survey Monkey is a popular online survey tool because it’s easy to send free surveys, polls or questionnaires.

Socrative is another student response system that empowers teachers to engage their classrooms through a series of educational exercises and games via smartphones, laptops, and tablets.  Socrative is better for teacher-directed consensus building.  Teachers login through their device and select an activity which controls the flow of questions and games. Students simply login with their device or online, and interact real time with the content.

For schools using iPads, Nearpod allows teachers to create enriched multimedia presentations with interactive features using their cloud-based content tool and then share the content with the students and control the activity with the Nearpod app.  Students submit responses on their mobile devices while the teacher monitors classroom activity and measure student results on an individual and aggregate basis.

Celly is a mobile social network that works with any mobile phone or device. Members can join instantly with one text and exchange group messages, polls, reminders, and web alerts.  Celly can enhances school communication such as:  study groups, announcement for clubs, field trips, clickers & polling, reminders and alerts, notes, and interactive walls.  Learn more at http://cel.ly/school and Celly for School Start Up Guide.

Another simple solution for polling is by using Google Forms and Sheets.  Students or teachers can create a customized form to gather feedback, vote on a result, or brainstorm solutions and then the responses are collected in a spreadsheet.  Form creators can choose whether to require users to login with their Google accounts or be anonymous.  Creators can use a variety of questions types like checkboxes, grid, drop-down lists with options, multiple choice, paragraph text (which allow for long answers) or scale.  You can add section headers to divide your form in sections to make it easier to read and complete and/or you can split the questions into multiple pages

Here are six examples of different ways to collect data using a Google Form:

  1. Have students conduct experiment in classroom and one member goes to teacher’s computer to enter data for that group
  2. Have students create surveys using Google forms and display on own computer; students travel from machine to machine to fill out the survey
  3. Email the form to participants to collect data (can embed the form in the email); must know all members email addresses
  4. Email the form by using a distribution list from your contacts  (very easy if using Google Apps since all domain names are the same)
  5. Share the URL of the published form; consider using a URL shortener for easy access like:  http://goo.gl/http://bit.ly/ or http://tinyurl.com/
  6. Embed the form in a Google Site, Google+, wiki, blog or Moodle.

Finally, a favorite tool of mine is Doodle for deciding on meeting times when there are multiple options and several attendees.  Doodle will also automatically sync appointments to your calendar.

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Co-Creation & Ideation Tools

Co-creation and ideation tools facilitate the most direct interaction between team members on the goals or desired outcomes of the project. Using these tools, participants can often work in groups directly editing or building the project artifact.  Several of these tools are the same ones used for project management – which is great – because the students will already be familiar with the interface.

Google Apps for Education A group of students can work together on an in Google Docs and Spreadsheets, seeing changes in real time and even discuss the process or comment right within the tool.  Everything is automatically saved in the cloud which means that documents, presentations and sites can be accessed – and edited – on almost any mobile device, computer or tablet.

Group members can edit documents, presentations or websites with images, videos, tables, drawings, or links and teachers or other students can give feedback by adding comments. The discussion feature (now available in Spreadsheet and Presentations as well as Docs) allows team members to talk about the project, what to do, how its going, etc right within the project.  You can even use the Research tool right within Documents to search for content on the web. Google Sites can be used as a portfolio or as a place to embed and showcase student projects. As a teacher you can create a template of a Site that contains directions, examples, links to resources and helpful tips and then have your students make a copy of the site.   This productivity suite was made for collaboration!  Other collaboration suites are:  Zoho Docs  and Microsoft 365.

Google Apps Examples:

  • Spanish students worked collaboratively to create a newspaper with a variety of articles: “LA PRENSA DE LAS PANTERAS”
  • Students use a Google form to collect data about the relationship between your height and wingspan to prove or disprove Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man”
  • Students researched Biomes and various projects were embedded into a Google Site

WikispacesWikispaces: A wiki is a website which allows its users to add, modify, or delete its content via a web browser.  On a wiki students can share work and ideas, pictures and links, videos and media.  A wiki can be made public so anyone can edit the space or limited to just a class or a few participants.  Many different types of projects can be embedded in a wiki so they work well for showcasing projects made with other tools like:  videos, documents, polls, calendars, maps and specific Web 2.0 tools where you can get the HTML embed code (example:  Google Presentations, VoiceThread). Wikispaces provides free wikis for teachers and they do not contain ads. Don’t forget the tips for collaborative projects using Wikispaces. Another wiki option is PBWorks.

Wiki Examples:

  • High School online collaborative writing wiki
  • Elementary students in Auckland, New Zealand are using part of their class wiki as a blog and the other half to showcase student-created projects.
  • wiki to showcase student-made math movies

 

Evernote is a great tool for students and teachers to capture notes, save research, collaborate on projects, snap photos of whiteboards, record audio and more. Everything you add to your account is automatically synced and made available on all the computers, phones and tablets you use.  Notebooks can then be shared with group members and accessed from anywhere.

Evernote Examples:

  • Elementary grade students use Evernote for student portfolios
  • Here is a blog post how a Librarian uses Evernote as a research tool.

 

MeetingWords is a very simple text editor for the web. Your text is saved on the web, and more than one person can edit the same document at the same time. Everybody’s changes are instantly reflected on all screens.  You can work together on notes, brainstorming sessions, homework, etc.

Other content creation options:

VoiceThread:  A VoiceThread is a collaborative, multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos and allows people to navigate slides and leave comments in 5 ways – using voice through a Facebook Fan Page (with a mic or telephone), text, audio file, or video (via a webcam). Share a VoiceThread with friends, students, and colleagues for them to record comments too. Users can doodle while commenting, use multiple identities, and pick which comments are shown through moderation. VoiceThreads can even be embedded to show and receive comments on other websites and exported to MP3 players or DVDs to play as archival movies. (https://voicethread.com/about/features/)  Here is a wiki with VoiceThread examples: http://voicethread4education.wikispaces.com/


Prezi:
  Prezi is a virtual whiteboard that transforms presentations where images and words work together to present an idea or lesson.  You can work together on the same prezi in real-time. With Prezi Meeting, teams can collaborate live or simply present prezis with up to 10 people in a prezi at one time. Prezi Meeting is included in all license types.

 


 

Ideation

Ideation is the process of generating, developing, and communicating new ideas.  There are several technology tools that support this brainstorming process.

Mindmeister:  You can work with multiple users simultaneously on the same mind map. All collaborators will be shown in the map footer if they are working on the same mind map. You can turn on the History View to see what changes have been done by which users. You can share your mind maps with a single collaborator, group, or public.  You can give presentations directly from MindMeister either online to other collaborators or with a projector.

Popplet:  Popplet is a place to collect ideas.  Its very simple to use easy great for younger kids.  You can collect inspiration, record thoughts, explore ideas, create galleries. Popplets share be shared and collaborated in real time.

Padlet:  (formerly called Wallwisher) is a super easy way to collect ideas, images, and multimedia onto a simple “wall”.  Works great on tablets too.

Other mind-mapping tools: Webspiration Classroom and Creately (paid)


Creative Commons / Copyfriendly Images/Audio/Music

Discuss with students how we can honor intellectual property by searching the web for “copyfriendly” images to use for collaborative projects.  Help students to understand that all of their work – whether digital or not – is copyrighted the minute they create it. You do not need a © symbol to copyright your work.  You created it – you own it!

I like to appeal to the creative musicians, photographers and artists in my classes.  I try to help students understand that they can CHOOSE to share their creations and still maintain ownership.  This leads to a discussion about Creative Commons licensing.  If a student is willing to share their work to be remixed, changed or altered they must decided whether to allow commercial use or not.  Going through the process of choosing a license for their own work reinforces the concept of “honoring” the intentions of the other content-creators.

Inevitably, a student brings up the concept of “fair use” and wonders why they can’t just so a Google image search for their school-related assignments.  Its at this point that we talk about the purpose of citations for school work – that citing an image for a PowerPoint or presentation means that you are not taking credit for having made the image used and are indicating on the Works Cited page who is the original owner.

This discussion helps students to understand that under fair use laws, teachers must still follow certain rules:

  • I will include a notice that the materials are protected by copyright
  • I will use technology that reasonably limits the students’ ability to retain or further distribute the materials
  • I will make the materials available to the students only for a period of time that is relevant to the context of a class session.

Sure, there are always going to be those who think that if its on the Internet then they should be able to use it. But presenting Copyright vs. Creative Commons in a way that explains WHY and focus on HONORING the work of others, gets kids thinking about themselves as content-creators and how they would feel if someone “stole” their work and made money off it.

My all-time favorite resource to share with students is Joyce Valenza’s CopyFriendly Resource Page.

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Resource Management Tools

Keeping track of resources when doing projects can be time-consuming and challenging in a collaborative environment. A simple sortable spreadsheet can be used to track member’s progress, schedules, resources, assets, and contacts.  Each member can refer to the document to know the next steps, click on links to shared documents or document their own contribution.  Teachers can easily refer to the document to check progress or leave comments to the whole team.  Google Sheets or Zoho Creator are two great options – each with their own strengths and purpose. Younger students might find using a wiki easier for managing groups projects or even Edmodo because they can have conversations and include links at the same time. Another great option for organizing online resources is using an online bookmarking tool.

Social Bookmarking is a method for users to store, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages on the Internet with the help of metadata or tags and then share ideas with others.  These tools work great for collaborative projects because each member of the project can locate online resources and easily share them with group members through tagging.  When you sort your bookmarks by tags you can also see other popular bookmarks made by others who used the same tag. These curated links can help you discover new resources such as websites, pdfs, videos and images. Member of group projects can invent a special tag for their project or send their bookmarks directly to team members or by setting up a group. The two main social bookmarking websites that are used in education today are:  Diigo and Delicious.

DiigoDiigo is social bookmarking plus has features like adding sticky notes and highlighting on the web. Special premium accounts are available for K-12 and higher education at Education Diigo with these features:

  • You can create student accounts for an entire class with just a few clicks (and student email addresses are optional for account creation)
  • Students of the same class are automatically set up as a Diigo group so they can start using all the benefits that a Diigo group provides, such as group bookmarks and annotations, and group forums.
  • Privacy settings of student accounts are pre-set so that only teachers and classmates can communicate with them.
  • Ads presented to student account users are limited to education-related sponsors.

Pinterest is a popular tool to use for organizing online resources but students may not consider using it in an educational setting. Since you can create new boards, move pins from one board to another, and even subscribe to boards made by others, students might find it to be a fun and creative way to gather resources – especially visuals – for a collaborative project. Example of a Pinterest board:  New in Young Adult Fiction. Other related resource gathering tools worth checking out are:  Scoop-itLiveBinders, and Symbaloo

 

Picasa Web AlbumsPhotographs online – Flickr and Picasa Web Albums (which has been incorporated into Google+ Photos) are two photosharing web services. Both have tagging and sorting functions that encourage collaboration and community building. This is a  great place to share images for collaborative projects and determine whether you want to make the albums public or private. Don’t forget to review your school’s Acceptable Use Policy before you start allowing students to use online photo sharing.

Here are some ideas for using online images in the classroom:

  • Web albums can be embedded into other Web 2.0 tools like wikis and Google Docs and that streamlines the process of adding images to projects since the images are already online and don’t need to be re-uploaded (saves time and bandwidth).  Plus any group member can contribute to the album.
  • Another feature of online images is that they can be geo-tagged so that the location of the image can be tracked or be combined with a map.
  • Online image albums are a great way to document each step of a collaborative project.  Put one student in charge of taking photos along the way so the images be used when students are reflecting on their own learning during the evaluation process.
  • Images in web albums can be used for story starters, collaborative books, scrapbooks, photo journals, maps, screenshots, or capturing the notes on a whiteboard.

Other options for storing images online:  Upload directly into Google Drive for storage, embed them into project notes created with Evernote, or add them as attachments by email, on a Google Site or wiki.

Other Media:  Often students will want to use a variety of media during collaborative projects.  While it would be challenging for students to edit videos and audio files in the same program at the same time, many options are available for broadcasting or embedding media to intended audiences.  Media files can simply be stored online for sharing with group members using Google Drive or DropBox.

Here are few media resources worth reviewing:

  • YouTube is blocked in many schools but educators are now finding so many useful resources there that many schools are reconsidering their policies or considering YouTube for Schools. Here you can access or upload educational videos on YouTube in a controlled environment.  Note: YouTube EDU is a sub-section of YouTube that contains high-quality educational content. YouTube for Schools is a network setting that, when implemented, allows your school to access the educational content on YouTube EDU while limiting access to non-educational content on YouTube.com. YouTube.com/Teachers is a how-to site that shows you how to use YouTube in the classroom.
  • Podcasts are audio files that are uploaded online and shared through programs like iTunes or Juice.  An excellent Podcasting resource is from Wes Fryer at:  http://www.speedofcreativity.org/resources/podcast-resources/.
  • VoiceThread is a multimedia platform that encourages discussions about images, video and documents.
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