Resources

Open Source Tools and Content

Open Licenses You Can Use

Creative Commons – www.creativecommons.org

(The CC BY-SA or CC BY are recommended licenses for education.)

GFDL – www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html

Tools

MediaWiki (wikis) – www.mediawiki.org

WordPress (blogs) – www.wordpress.org

www.wordpress.com will host your blog as well.

Moodle (course management) – www.moodle.org

OpenOffice (productivity) – www.openoffice.org

The Open CD (various) – www.theopencd.org

GIMP (image editing) – www.gimp.org

Audacity (sound editing) – http://audacity.sourceforge.net

CamStudio (screen recording) – www.camstudio.org

Content

Freely Usable Audio Content*

ccMixter – www.ccmixter.org

Wikimedia Commons music – http://commons.wikimedia.org

Spoken Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Spoken_articles

The Freesound Project – http://freesound.iua.upf.edu/

Common Content www.commoncontent.org

Internet Archive – www.archive.org/details/audio

Freely Usable Photo and Video Content*

Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org

flickr – www.flickr.com/

creativecommons/ Common Content – www.commoncontent.org

Morguefile – www.morguefile.com/

Stock.XCHNG – www.sxc.hu

* Make sure to read license terms for individual content sources.

Educational Content/Curriculum

Wikibooks and Wikijunior – www.wikibooks.org

Free-Reading – www.free-reading.net

Curriki – www.curriki.org

WikiEducator – www.wikieducator.org

OER Commons – www.oercommomns.org

Learn NC www.learnnc.org

MIT OpenCourseware – http://ocw.mit.edu

Audio Books and Ebooks

LibriVox – www.librivox.org

Spoken Alexandria Project – www.spokenalex.org

Telltale Weekly – www.telltaleweekly.org

Project Gutenberg – www.gutenberg.org

LoudLit.org – www.loudlit.org

Lit2Go – http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/

Podcasting

Video

Wiki

CMS

One Reply to “Resources”

  1. Good morning Colette,

    This summer my goal is to educate myself on how to utilize technology in the classroom to enhance learning. I want to support the students’ learning to reach a higher level of thinking, not to just add technology into the classroom.

    In the past few years, I feel I have been using the iPad to add fun for the students, but not to engage the student into a higher level of thinking; or I have used Google.docs for collaboration of the students but have not seen the full benefits of those collaborations. I hope this makes sense.

    There is a multitude of apps and sites and blogs and etc. Where does one begin to make these beneficial to the learner and teacher?

    I teach at a Catholic school in Tigard. We have little, to no training with Google.docs or the iPads, and the school is now purchasing Chrome books. How and where does a teacher start to utilize technology in class to enhance learning as well as raise the students critical thinking?

    Any help and/or guidance would be appreciated. I am looking at training myself this summer to be more comfortable with Google.docs and blogs.

    Sincerely,

    Lynette Good

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