TLchat: new faces and new voices

Last December, fellow Librarian Tiffany Whitehead put out an all call for some Teacher Librarians to step up and help bring some new blood to the TL Virtual Cafe — which had been on hiatus.  I said I would help out and two months ago we launched the updated TL Virtual Cafe & #TLchat Twitter Chat.

In February, I called upon a few Library Instructional Technology Teachers from Beaverton School District to help talk about Passion in Your Future Ready Library (webinar archive available).  We had a few technology glitches in Blackboard during the webinar but the Twitter chat was going strong!  Thanks for helping:  Benjamin Lloyd, Highland Park Middle School, @SenorLloyd – Virtual Reality Projects; Rosa Rothenberg – Whitford Middle School @rosarothenb; and Jason Hohnbaum – McKary Elementary School @mrhohnbaum.

In March, Stony Evans had some of his students present for the webinar and it was FANTASTIC!!!  Wow — we need more student voices in our teacher professional development. Check out the webinar here!

The April webinar will be Monday, April 3rd and the topic is eBooks. Here is the Blackboard Participant link and the webinar will be archived here.

Join us if you can!

Colette’s Future Ready: News You Can Use

FutureReady2

I’ve been gathering some of my favorite resources for a new website that I am creating for my new position at Library Instructional Technology Teacher at Sunset High School.  Here’s my initial shares.

Chromebook

Google Apps for Education

  • Google Apps for Education – Training lessons and educator-created materials from Google.
  • Google Classroom resources from Alice Keeler – Math teacher and Google Classroom guru.
    • Alice posts great Classroom resources from her book:  50 Things To Do With Google Classroom and is a wealth of knowledge on all things Google Apps for Education.  Follow her on Twitter.
  • TimelineJS 3 from Knight Lab at Northwestern University uses a Google Spreadsheet to create an easy to make an interactive timeline with text, images, videos, sound files, etc.

Information Literacy

  • OSLIS for Secondary Teachers: OSLIS is the state funded Oregon School Library Information System that provides access to electronic databases for every Library in the the state.  This site also provides ideas for teaching research as well as an easy to use Citation Maker.
  • Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab).  The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction.

iPad

Library

  • Oregon School Library Standards – A strong school library program includes instruction to support student achievement of standards in: Information Literacy, Reading Engagement, Social Responsibility and Technology Integration.
  • YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) Book and Media Awards and Lists for Libraries.

Subject Resources

Social Studies
  • Gapminder – Gapminder is a non-profit venture promoting sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals by increased use and understanding of statistics and other information about social, economic and environmental development at local, national and global levels.
  • The Racial Dot Map – This map is an American snapshot; it provides an accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country.
Video Editing

100 Day Plan for a new job

The Prompt:  Before interviewing for my new position, I was asked to outline my 100 Day Plan for starting the school year as a new Library Instructional Technology Teacher. Planning my first 100 days gave me time to really reflect on the responsibilities of the new position and make concrete plans of how I would implement it.  I even searched “100 Day Plan” online and found examples from business and educational leaders.

30/60/90 day milestones: Below are my initial notes and now I am going through my calendar and intentionally scheduling reminders to meet with specific people, follow up on goals, checks for progress. etc.  I plan to check in with key stakeholders at 30/60/90 days and review goals and adjust as needed.

You don’t need to be starting a new job to put together a 100 plan.  The beginning of the school year is a great time to intentionally set goals and make adjustments.  What’s your 100 day plan?


 

For my 100 Day Plan I decided to focus on 4 areas:  Build Relationships, Information Literacy & Technology Curriculum, Professional Development and Promoting Literacy.

 

Build Relationships

  • Be visible, be positive and communicate :  eat lunch, hang out, attend department meetings, compliment teachers on success, get to know my Library Assistants, secretaries, IT, custodian
  • Meet with key stakeholders:  admin team, department chairs, student leaders, tech teachers, potential teachers for Technology Integration team, PTO.
    • As you reflect on this year, what has been the greatest success?  What has been the greatest challenge?
    • *What looks different in your classroom this year compared to last year?
    • *What skills/talents do you think you possess that you would feel comfortable sharing with other staff members?
    • *As we think about our journey over the past three years, what will take us from great to exceptional?  What next steps will help us continue to move forward?
  • Listen learn & observe:  Identify current/previous successes and challenges,   These conversations and a staff survey (before Day 50) will guide planning for next steps to ensure a culture of learning that is supportive of students, staff, and the community.
  • Lead with integrity and professionalism.  ‘EQ’, emotional intelligence, is more important than IQ when it comes to achieving success in the first 100 days

Information Literacy & Technology Curriculum

  • Gather information about current tech & library skill projects:  BSD Innovation Grant about information literacy & digital citizenship
  • Begin building a matrix that show these projects across grade levels & disciplines & track their goals, resources, time & outcomes.
  • Work with District Library & Technology  team on current implementation plans; providing a variety of current print and digital information resources to best match student inquiry needs.providing a variety of current print and digital information resources to best match student inquiry needs.
  • Align these projects with the Oregon State Library Standards & Common Core
    • Core: Information Literacy, Reading Engagement, Social Responsibility and Technology Integration  Because research literacy constitutes the backbone of the CCSS, students who master library standards can expect to experience greater success in reaching academic proficiencies.
      • Reading of complex text, attentive reading and reflective reading help students reach greater understanding & develop the stamina necessary for addressing complicated problems.
      • Learning to work in small groups, share information and evaluate a work for authenticity and clarity, help students to develop standards for improvement and achievement.
      • Learning to be an ethical user of written, digital and social content help students become responsible participants in a democratic society.
      • Learning to navigate and integrate a variety of technology leads to competence, confidence and creativity.
  • Talk with STUDENTS!
  • Seek out collaborators to provide digital resources for underserved populations/ diverse cultures or backgrounds or those who speak limited or no English.

Professional Development

  • Develop a core technology integration team that’s primary focus is to develop ideas of how technology can support curriculum and impact student learning
    • Use survey results to assess faculty needs:  “Needs Assessment”
    • Determine best manner of implementation:  informal or formal
    • Be intentional about developing a strong collaborative school culture:  Praise for innovation, risk taking, continuing development & effort.  Emphasize effectiveness, not popularity. Showcasing exemplars for grade-level expectations and progressions
    • Find collaborative teams that want to move forward in a specific area:  Teachers who use collaborative tech tools, teachers using a common assessment with backward planning, remedial tech skills, Multimedia projects (narrated speeches)
    • Use technology as a way of formative assessment, making thinking visible, differentiating instruction, performance assessments, evidence-based learning
    • Create a feedback loop channel & evaluation.  Are your needs being met? What other assistance can be offered?
    • Utilize Professional Learning Communities as Data Teams to monitor progress and respond to the effectiveness of instruction.   Is there strong evidence that it is directly related to improving student performance?
  • Use fun & creative technology for faculty meeting programs.  Example:  Use GetKahoot to review student policies, dress code, tardies, etc.
  • Tech Tip Tuesday style newsletter, website, dedicated hashtag – share & archive resources
  • Schedule dedicated informal tech:  Breakfast Club, Appy Hour, Tech Tuesdays. Invite staff and student volunteers to showcase their learning

Promote Literacy

  • Meet with current assistants and student book club to get input about how to promote literacy
  • Create the library to be an inviting space with creative book displays, shelf talkers, QR codes, book lists
  • Make connections with non-fiction literacy connected to Common Core subjects
  • Promote literacy programs:  Banned Books Week,  Teen Read Week, #SunsetReads:  involve staff in displaying what they are currently reading.
  • Participate in OASL Battle of the Books, voting for ORCA (Oregon Readers Choice Award) and other community based programs.

By 100 days — Be ready to begin long term School-wide Technology Integration Plan.

edcamp PDX

A few Portland area educators one evening were discussing on Twitter that we should get together face-to-face and meet each other and share ideas .. and bring a friend. Next thing you know we start brainstorming ideas for an unconference workshop day. What is an unconference? An unconference is a day where teachers / admins/ tech coordinators / Principals / IT folks self-organize their own day of professional development.

edcampPDX was born out of that discussion. Our first annual edcampPDX will be held at La Salle Catholic College Preparatory on Thursday, August 18th from 8:30-3pm. Information can be found at: http://edcamppdx.wikispaces.com/

The edcamp format expects everyone to come ready to learn and share. Sessions are suggested by participants and lead by participants. Its good old fashion do-it-yourself professional development. You learn what you want to learn.

I’m hoping some folks will lead discussions about:

  • Project based learning
  • Moodle 2.0
  • WWG (wonderful world of Google)
  • Collaborating with fellow teachers
  • Bring you own devices
  • Web 2.0 smackdown

HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!  http://edcamppdx.wikispaces.com/

Gabcast for easy recordings

This past week I attend the EdTech PD Cadre sponsored by OETC and ODE.  One of our activities was to use a Web 2.0 tool to reflect on one of the goals of the year-long program.  We chose:

A goal of the EdTech PD Cadre is to identify and disseminate best practices targeting technology integration into teaching and learning by focusing on exemplary staff development skills

Here is our reflection post:

Do you want to easily record people’s opinions on the go – well then use the mini-computer in your pocket – your cell phone.  Gabcast allows to easily record interviews, podcasts, speeches, language practice, etc… all on your cell phone.

For our example, we set up a Channel on Gabcast.  I dialed the 1-888 number and put in the channel number that I created during set up.  I began the first episode and recorded an interview with a cadre member – asking them to discuss ideas for effective staff development.  After the interview I selected #2 to publish the episode on the Gabcast website.  Immediately I was able to record a new episode so I passed my phone around 2 times and each interview was a separate recording.

Go to this website to hear our recordings:  http://www.gabcast.com/index.php?a=episodes&id=23214

If you were subscribed to my channel, you would received notification of each new episode in your RSS Reader.

You can also download the audio files and use them in videos, VoiceThreads, photostory, or edit them in Audacity.

Classroom use ideas:

  • Record interviews (career, grandparent interviews)
  • Make your own field trip audio guide
  • Record speeches
  • Foreign language practice
  • Record opinions about hot topics
  • Don’t have enough microphones in your classroom?  Allow your students to use their cell phones instead!

I’m sure you can find hundreds of ways you can use this in your classroom or during your professional development workshops.  Have fun!

Professional Development Meme

Martha Thornburg tagged me for this Professional Development Goals Meme.  I first met Martha at a DEN event at the NCCE conference in Seattle but more recently the two of us represented the beautiful NW at the Google Teacher Academy.  She bugged me about finishing my STAR Discovery Educator application so I guess I will need to include that for one of my goals.

Directions

Summer can be a great time for professional development. It is an opportunity to learn more about a topic, read a particular work or the works of a particular author, beef up an existing unit of instruction, advance one’s technical skills, work on that advanced degree or certification, pick up a new hobby, and finish many of the other items on our ever-growing To Do Lists. Let’s make Summer 2008 a time when we actually get to accomplish a few of those things and enjoy the thrill of marking them off our lists.

The Rules:

  1. Pick 3 professional development goals and commit to achieving them this summer.
  2. For the purposes of this activity the end of summer will be Labor Day (09/01/08).
  3. Post the above directions along with your 3 goals on your blog.
  4. Title your post Professional Development Meme and link back/trackback to http://clifmims.com/blog/archives/353.
  5. Use the following tag/ keyword/ category on your post: pdmeme.
  6. Tag 8 others to participate in the meme.
  7. Achieve your goals and “develop professionally.”
  8. Commit to sharing your results on your blog during early or mid-September.

Colette’s Goals:

  1. My STAR Discovery Education application is complete, I just need to host my first event.  I plan on meeting with the middle school teachers & Librarian in August and take a couple of hours to review unitedstreaming and discuss how we are going to implement media into our curriculum this year.  The PD will be held during the week of August 18-22.
  2. Finish listening to audio version of Wikinomics and read Here Comes Everybody (already ordered it from Amazon).
  3. Take the time to go back and look at each of the Google tools that were introduced at the GTA and write out my action plan -which is due June 25th.

I Tag my new GCT friends …
If you see your name below, you know what to do.

A Path to Becoming a 21st Century Literate Educator — Self Development

I love these ideas from David Warlick’s blog.  Every educator needs to be a self-directed LEARNER and develop their own community of practice to assist them in developing themselves as a literate 21st century educator.

  1. Find two or more other educators in your school who are interested in learning and using emerging information and communication  technologies.  It would be of enormous advantage if you can include your schools library media specialist.
  2. Identify the appropriate person in your school or district who can provide technical support and configuration for your increasingly utilized computers and network.  Bake them some chocolate chip cookies.
  3. Identify some edu-bloggers who are talking about the emerging ICTs you are considering.  See the Bloggers to Learn From wiki, contributed to by a world community of educators.
  4. Delegate!  Assign each member of your team some of the selected blogs to follow, and share specific posts with each other.
  5. Read, study, and discuss books about teaching and learning and the world we’re doing it in.  See the Books to Learn From. wiki, contributed to by a world community of educators.
  6. Schedule regular meetings (once or twice a month) at a local restaurant, coffee shop, or pizzeria (preferably with WiFi).  Meet and discuss what you’ve learned and what you want to learn.
  7. Start a group del.icio.us (A social bookmarks service) account for organizing and sharing web resources.
  8. Start a wiki for posting notes, links, and step-by-step instructions.
  9. Join one or more of the Ning social networks, such as: School 2.0, Library 2.0, Classroom 2.0.
  10. Start your own blogs for sharing your reflections on what you are learning and how you are learning it.
  11. Start experimenting in your class and share the results.
  12. Share your results with other teachers in your school and Invite them into your conversation.

Start to model, in your job as a teacher, the practice of being a master learner.