New Chrome extension for Opposing Viewpoints in Action

Check out the new Chrome Extension (beta) from Gale Cengage for the database Opposing Viewpoints in Action. Many of the classes at my school use this database as jumping off points for students selecting topics for research.

Traditionally, we have directed students to access the database from the Sunset Library webpage bit.ly/sunsetlibrary and I will encourage to continue to do that but the new Chrome extension now displays results from Opposing Viewpoints in Action alongside Google search results.


This is a game changer! We can now teach students the concept of “triangulation” and comparing the credibility of open web results with published articles from essays, academic journals, and reference books.

 Here are the directions of how students can install the Chrome extension.

Your students will need to fill out the database credentials listed to authenticate to your District account. Include:

  • Library Name
  • Gale Library Location Id
  • Gale Library Password Id

Note: This only works for Google searches on the Chrome browser (Chromebook, Mac or PC) with Opposing Viewpoints!

  I am VERY excited about the possibilities of utilizing this for research and also teaching other information literacy strategies, including source evaluation and advanced Google search techniques.

 The extension is in BETA but I heard from the Gale Cengage rep that other databases will be added after a thorough review.

 Happy Searching!

Encouraging Curiosity

As a Librarian, I am often asked to help with research projects with my high school students.  Some projects are truly great and engaging but too often I wonder just how interested are the students in learning something new or are they “just doing enough” to get the grade.

Creating a culture in your Library, classroom or school that embraces curiosity and celebrates learning can spark the imagination of students — especially when they have CHOICE in choosing what to research.  Teachers can do a lot to establish and model regular curiosity by asking questions, wondering aloud, sharing cool things they have learned, showing videos that are inspiring, etc.  When students see their Librarian and Teacher excited by their new discoveries they, in turn, will want to share what they have learned.

Former Social Studies teacher from Sunset High School and now District TOSA, Matt Hiefield, had every student create their own digital “Curiosity Board”  for 9th grade World History using a website called Linoit (http://en.linoit.com/).  Linoit is similar to Padlet (https://padlet.com/) and is like a digital corkboard where you can post images, text and embed videos. If an interesting question came up during a class discussion, Hiefield would direct his students to add it to their own curiosity board for investigation later on. Occasionally, he would have students research a chosen question and share what they learned during a gallery walk. What a great way to celebrate being curious!

If we want our students to be excellent researchers and be authentic in their interest in learning, we must make every effort to build a culture that acknowledges and celebrates deep learning. How do you create this culture in your classroom?

Science News magazine on EBSCO

Besides academic journals, EBSCO has some magazines in their results and I saw that Science News is one of them.

  1. First I went to the Sunset Library Resource page and chose Academic Search Complete https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/IT/Library-Resources/Pages/sunset.aspx
  2. You are automatically logged on when on campus; off campus needs your username and password.
  3. I chose Advanced Search but didn’t put anything in search (but you could) and just checked full text and wrote Science News for the publication and chose Search.
  4. This gives results from the magazine.  Then I changed the Relevance drop down menu to Date Newest and it displays all the Science News articles in reverse chronological order and most are PDFs from the magazine.
  5. You could also filter it by Cover Story if you only want more in depth stories.
  6. When you open the PDFs of each issue you can advance through the issue pages a few at a time and easily switch to a different issue.

Nifty tip:  If  you use a Chrome browser and are logged into your Google account you can “print” the articles directly to Google Drive – either the PDF or the HTML version.

Note:  Not all sources have original PDFs from the magazines – some are just the article text.  Some other science sources I found when searching (beside academic journals):  Popular Science, New Scientist, Science Now, Current Science, Scientific American, plus Time, US News & World Report, and Newsweek.