Science News magazine on EBSCO

Besides academic journals, EBSCO has some magazines in their results and I saw that Science News is one of them.

  1. First I went to the Sunset Library Resource page and chose Academic Search Complete
  2. You are automatically logged on when on campus; off campus needs your username and password.
  3. I chose Advanced Search but didn’t put anything in search (but you could) and just checked full text and wrote Science News for the publication and chose Search.
  4. This gives results from the magazine.  Then I changed the Relevance drop down menu to Date Newest and it displays all the Science News articles in reverse chronological order and most are PDFs from the magazine.
  5. You could also filter it by Cover Story if you only want more in depth stories.
  6. When you open the PDFs of each issue you can advance through the issue pages a few at a time and easily switch to a different issue.

Nifty tip:  If  you use a Chrome browser and are logged into your Google account you can “print” the articles directly to Google Drive – either the PDF or the HTML version.

Note:  Not all sources have original PDFs from the magazines – some are just the article text.  Some other science sources I found when searching (beside academic journals):  Popular Science, New Scientist, Science Now, Current Science, Scientific American, plus Time, US News & World Report, and Newsweek.


Accessing Electronic Resources


One of my #1 goals this year as a LITT is to expose faculty and students to the wide variety of electronic resources available through Beaverton School District.

Research shows that one area college-level students are lacking is in their ability to locate, access and disseminate scholarly material — especially from academic electronic databases.  

So if our goal is for Sunset students to be college and career ready our students need to know this information!

  1. Electronic Resources:  Access the Sunset Library catalog, electronic databases, eBooks, encyclopedias, etc from the Sunset Library Resource Page (hint:  bookmark it or access it from the Staff bookmark link!).  EBSCO Academic Search Complete is a new database to Beaverton this year!

  2. Handouts: Look over the two PDF handouts that were sent by email.

    1. One is a faculty handout which explains how to log in, search, share resource lists and passwords for various databases.

    2. Feel free to make copies of the student handout for your classes.  (This would be a great addition to the 9th grade notebook).  Pass this out to students but please don’t publish the password on a public website!

  3. Instruction: Invite me to a learning team meeting or to one of your classes and I will teach how to access the resources and give hints on how to conduct an effective search.

  4. Breakfast Club!  Want to meet 1:1 or with a few other to learn the basics of searching and access any of our electronic databases?  Let’s meet in Colette’s office Wednesday mornings at 7:15am for a refresher. Just drop by anytime :)

Cross posted at



What can a LITT do for you?

Every so often I will send out an email to my faculty with helpful tips and resources.  All information will be archived on my resource site:

9/8/15   What Can A LITT Do For You?
LITT stands for “Library Instructional Technology Teacher” and my role is to be an embedded resource at Sunset High School to help us move forward with the Future Ready initiative.  I am a certified School Librarian and technology evangelist!  I love to work with teachers in designing unit plans, locating print and digital resources for students to use and offering suggestion of how technology might engage students to impact and deepen their learning.  So what can a LITT do for you?  Here are a few ideas …

  1. Invite me to a Learning Team meeting — especially when you are planning out an instructional unit. I might be able to suggest electronic database resources or offer to help co-teach a technology lesson.
  2. I can locate and evaluate print and electronic resources to support your curriculum.  Give me a heads up and the Media Center staff can pull books onto a cart for you or I can peruse websites or our database collections and narrow down resources to match your curriculum.
  3. Struggling with a tech issues like building a Google Site or setting up a course in Canvas and you need someone to help you out?  Invite me to sit with you 1:1 and we will work on it together.
  4. Invite me into your classroom to promote the #SunsetReads program.  I can booktalk my favorite YA books, bring along interesting non-fiction titles to match your curriculum or take a #SunsetReads photo for the display.

Cross posted: 


Colette’s Future Ready: News You Can Use


I’ve been gathering some of my favorite resources for a new website that I am creating for my new position at Library Instructional Technology Teacher at Sunset High School.  Here’s my initial shares.


Google Apps for Education

  • Google Apps for Education – Training lessons and educator-created materials from Google.
  • Google Classroom resources from Alice Keeler – Math teacher and Google Classroom guru.
    • Alice posts great Classroom resources from her book:  50 Things To Do With Google Classroom and is a wealth of knowledge on all things Google Apps for Education.  Follow her on Twitter.
  • TimelineJS 3 from Knight Lab at Northwestern University uses a Google Spreadsheet to create an easy to make an interactive timeline with text, images, videos, sound files, etc.

Information Literacy

  • OSLIS for Secondary Teachers: OSLIS is the state funded Oregon School Library Information System that provides access to electronic databases for every Library in the the state.  This site also provides ideas for teaching research as well as an easy to use Citation Maker.
  • Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab).  The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction.



  • Oregon School Library Standards – A strong school library program includes instruction to support student achievement of standards in: Information Literacy, Reading Engagement, Social Responsibility and Technology Integration.
  • YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) Book and Media Awards and Lists for Libraries.

Subject Resources

Social Studies
  • Gapminder – Gapminder is a non-profit venture promoting sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals by increased use and understanding of statistics and other information about social, economic and environmental development at local, national and global levels.
  • The Racial Dot Map – This map is an American snapshot; it provides an accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country.
Video Editing

100 Day Plan for a new job

The Prompt:  Before interviewing for my new position, I was asked to outline my 100 Day Plan for starting the school year as a new Library Instructional Technology Teacher. Planning my first 100 days gave me time to really reflect on the responsibilities of the new position and make concrete plans of how I would implement it.  I even searched “100 Day Plan” online and found examples from business and educational leaders.

30/60/90 day milestones: Below are my initial notes and now I am going through my calendar and intentionally scheduling reminders to meet with specific people, follow up on goals, checks for progress. etc.  I plan to check in with key stakeholders at 30/60/90 days and review goals and adjust as needed.

You don’t need to be starting a new job to put together a 100 plan.  The beginning of the school year is a great time to intentionally set goals and make adjustments.  What’s your 100 day plan?


For my 100 Day Plan I decided to focus on 4 areas:  Build Relationships, Information Literacy & Technology Curriculum, Professional Development and Promoting Literacy.


Build Relationships

  • Be visible, be positive and communicate :  eat lunch, hang out, attend department meetings, compliment teachers on success, get to know my Library Assistants, secretaries, IT, custodian
  • Meet with key stakeholders:  admin team, department chairs, student leaders, tech teachers, potential teachers for Technology Integration team, PTO.
    • As you reflect on this year, what has been the greatest success?  What has been the greatest challenge?
    • *What looks different in your classroom this year compared to last year?
    • *What skills/talents do you think you possess that you would feel comfortable sharing with other staff members?
    • *As we think about our journey over the past three years, what will take us from great to exceptional?  What next steps will help us continue to move forward?
  • Listen learn & observe:  Identify current/previous successes and challenges,   These conversations and a staff survey (before Day 50) will guide planning for next steps to ensure a culture of learning that is supportive of students, staff, and the community.
  • Lead with integrity and professionalism.  ‘EQ’, emotional intelligence, is more important than IQ when it comes to achieving success in the first 100 days

Information Literacy & Technology Curriculum

  • Gather information about current tech & library skill projects:  BSD Innovation Grant about information literacy & digital citizenship
  • Begin building a matrix that show these projects across grade levels & disciplines & track their goals, resources, time & outcomes.
  • Work with District Library & Technology  team on current implementation plans; providing a variety of current print and digital information resources to best match student inquiry needs.providing a variety of current print and digital information resources to best match student inquiry needs.
  • Align these projects with the Oregon State Library Standards & Common Core
    • Core: Information Literacy, Reading Engagement, Social Responsibility and Technology Integration  Because research literacy constitutes the backbone of the CCSS, students who master library standards can expect to experience greater success in reaching academic proficiencies.
      • Reading of complex text, attentive reading and reflective reading help students reach greater understanding & develop the stamina necessary for addressing complicated problems.
      • Learning to work in small groups, share information and evaluate a work for authenticity and clarity, help students to develop standards for improvement and achievement.
      • Learning to be an ethical user of written, digital and social content help students become responsible participants in a democratic society.
      • Learning to navigate and integrate a variety of technology leads to competence, confidence and creativity.
  • Talk with STUDENTS!
  • Seek out collaborators to provide digital resources for underserved populations/ diverse cultures or backgrounds or those who speak limited or no English.

Professional Development

  • Develop a core technology integration team that’s primary focus is to develop ideas of how technology can support curriculum and impact student learning
    • Use survey results to assess faculty needs:  “Needs Assessment”
    • Determine best manner of implementation:  informal or formal
    • Be intentional about developing a strong collaborative school culture:  Praise for innovation, risk taking, continuing development & effort.  Emphasize effectiveness, not popularity. Showcasing exemplars for grade-level expectations and progressions
    • Find collaborative teams that want to move forward in a specific area:  Teachers who use collaborative tech tools, teachers using a common assessment with backward planning, remedial tech skills, Multimedia projects (narrated speeches)
    • Use technology as a way of formative assessment, making thinking visible, differentiating instruction, performance assessments, evidence-based learning
    • Create a feedback loop channel & evaluation.  Are your needs being met? What other assistance can be offered?
    • Utilize Professional Learning Communities as Data Teams to monitor progress and respond to the effectiveness of instruction.   Is there strong evidence that it is directly related to improving student performance?
  • Use fun & creative technology for faculty meeting programs.  Example:  Use GetKahoot to review student policies, dress code, tardies, etc.
  • Tech Tip Tuesday style newsletter, website, dedicated hashtag – share & archive resources
  • Schedule dedicated informal tech:  Breakfast Club, Appy Hour, Tech Tuesdays. Invite staff and student volunteers to showcase their learning

Promote Literacy

  • Meet with current assistants and student book club to get input about how to promote literacy
  • Create the library to be an inviting space with creative book displays, shelf talkers, QR codes, book lists
  • Make connections with non-fiction literacy connected to Common Core subjects
  • Promote literacy programs:  Banned Books Week,  Teen Read Week, #SunsetReads:  involve staff in displaying what they are currently reading.
  • Participate in OASL Battle of the Books, voting for ORCA (Oregon Readers Choice Award) and other community based programs.

By 100 days — Be ready to begin long term School-wide Technology Integration Plan.


A New Direction

DreamsQuoteI have this poster hanging in my office – I actually made alongside my Multimedia students a few years ago.  It reads Go confidently in the direction of your dreams – Live the life you have imagined” ~Thoreau.  

Well I never imagined that I would be announcing that I am leaving La Salle Catholic College Preparatory.

I have accepted a position with Beaverton School District at Sunset High School as their new Library Instructional Technology Teacher.  Sunset is one of 15 schools in the district designated as a “Future Ready School”.  The plan is to move towards a 1:1 environment and make sure all students are college and career ready.  Along with library assistants, I will work directly with faculty to help them use information literacy and technology to impact student learning.

My last five years at La Salle Prep have been some of the most rewarding of my professional career.  I have grown so much both personally and professionally working with the dedicated staff and want to thank La Salle Prep for their incredible support during this process.  

Sunset Principal John Huelskamp (formerly of de La Salle North) told me that a wise man named Tom Dudley (former La Salle Principal) once told him that you can be a Lasallian educator anywhere.  So I will proudly display “Let Us Remember …” on doorway of my office and think “… that we are in the presence of God” every time I walk through the halls of Sunset High School.


ISTE 2015

 Unleash the Power of Your iPad with “App Smashing”

Come play and learn the power of App Smashing, the process of using multiple apps in conjunction with one another to complete a new and creative final task or project. We’ll put together fun combinations of apps to use with middle and high school formative assessments, presentations and student work.

  • Scheduled:
    • Wednesday, July 1, 1:15–2:15 pm EDT (Eastern Daylight Time)
    • Building/Room: PCC 126A

This sessions will showcase iPad apps but the concept of app smashing is open to any platform or device. Participants may choose ANY apps to smash. I recommend they install five different types of apps but are not limited to these suggestions: Photo Editing/Collage/Comic Strip apps (including one where you can add text, such as: Phonto, Pic Collage, Strip Designer, etc ) Screencasting / Presentation apps (Such as: Keynote, Haiku Deck, Prezi, EduCreations, Explain Everything, etc) Interactive / ePub creation apps (Such as: Thinglink, Book Creator, Snapguide, etc) Multimedia Apps (Such as iMovie, VoiceThread, Tellagami, etc)




Google Apps training material

I often am asked to come to a school and provide a basic Google Apps for Education (GAFE) training during a faculty meeting.  Below is the sequence and activities that I use for a 2 hour training.  Feel free to use or adapt as needed.

Google Apps for Education (GAFE)

Activity 1:  Getting Started with a Google Form

Lets collaborate on a project by using a Google Form to collect data for the Mystery Book project.  Purpose of this activity:  See how a Google Form can be used to easily collect data.

  • Find a partner:  One person can be the recorder & one person can be the researcher
  • Locate a fiction or nonfiction book that you want students to share for a specific subject area or grade level. Each person should recommend (at least) one book.
  • Fill out this Google Form with your collected data and image URL
  • Here is a link to our collected RESULTS (linked removed for privacy purposes).

Before we move on …

6 Ways to collect data using a Google Form

  1. Have students conduct experiment in classroom and one member goes to teacher’s computer to enter data for that group
  2. Have students create surveys using Google forms and display on own computer; students travel from machine to machine to fill out the survey
  3. Email the form to participants to collect data (can embed the form in the email); must know all members email addresses
  4. Email the form by using a distribution list from your contacts  (very easy if using Google Apps since all domain names are the same)
  5. Share the URL of the published form; consider using a URL shortener for easy access like:, or
  6. Embed the form in a Google Site, wiki, blog or website.

Let’s brainstorm ways you can use Google Forms in your classroom:

  1. Surveys
  2. Exit ticket
  3. Collect favorite books you read the last term
  4. Supply inventory
  5. Get to know you survey
  6. Science lab data collection
  7. Checking in on long term project
  8. Voting

Activity 2:  Researching with Google Docs

Now that we have collected some book titles, each participant will conduct some basic research about the book to prepare for the Mystery Book Project.

Each participant should open a COPY of the Mystery Book research project document.

Helpful Google Docs tip:  To easily share a document with others where you want them to have a COPY of the document (versus viewing or editing) is to edit the end of the URL like this:

Thing to try on the Google Doc:

  1. Go to Tools / Research and open the research pane on the side of the Google document.  Search for your book title and locate the author’s name.  The research pane keeps the search process as part of the document writing process.
  2. What happens if you click on the Preview / Insert Link / Cite buttons in the Research Pane?
  3. Answer some of the questions. Notice the options for text formatting:  fonts, style, line spacing, indent, color, bullets, etc.
  4. Select one of the questions:  Go to Insert / Comment to leave a comment about this question.  For example:  Not sure who would like this type of book?  Comments are great for giving feedback during peer/teacher review process.
  5. Look at the options for inserting images into Docs.  You can crop images, recolor, adjust brightness, add borders, etc.
  6. Check the Revision History:  Go to File / See Revision History.  This is especially helpful if you want to see who edited a document or revert back to an earlier version.
  7. Select the blue icon SHARE.  Share this document with your partner for editing purposes.
  8. Find the grey folder icon next to the document title.  Selecting this will allow you to move your document to a specific folder.

Helpful Google Drive tip:  Have every students create a folder in Drive for a specific units/subject.  Students SHARE the Drive folder with the teacher.  Every time a student places a document, spreadsheet or slide presentation in the folder it will automatically be shared with the teacher.

Let’s brainstorm ways you can use Google Documents in your classroom:

  1. Any and all rough draft writing
  2. Peer editing
  3. Collaborative notetaking
  4. Shared resource lists:  books, links, images
  5. Classroom newsletter – publish to the web and embed doc on website
  6. Monthly calendar (table)
  7. Posters – use image options (recolor, crop, borders)

Activity 3:  Shared Slide Presentation for Mystery Book Project

The power of any of the Google Apps for Education tools is collaboration. Participants will will collaborate together to create a simple Slide Presentation that can be used two ways:

  1. Print as posters with a QR code
  2. Embedded as a slide presentation in a website, blog or wiki

The purpose of the Mystery Book slide deck is to create promotional posters to entice readers to read a book — without telling them the author or book title.  Users will need to click on the link or scan the QR code to reveal the title.  Perfect for a book display!

Editing the Google Slide deck:

  1. The Slide Deck has already been made and the link allows anyone with the link to edit.
  2. Notice that I already created a simple design with colors and fonts.  Go to Slide / Edit Master.  I find that this saves time and students focus more on the activity than editing the slides.
  3. The editing of Slides is very similar to Docs.
  4. Slides has some basic transitions and animations – but not as much as PowerPoint.  Go to View / Animations to see the options.
  5. You can embed YouTube videos in Google Slide decks.
  6. Users can write in the speaker notes section and print the slide with notes, if desired.
  7. I created the QR code with a Chrome extension: URL shortener.  Users will need a QR code reader (i-nigma) to scan the code & view the website
  8. Embed slideshow:  Go to File / Publish to the Web and you can choose options:  slide size, auto advance, repeat and get the embed code. This code can be embedded on a Google Site, website, blog:  <iframe src=”″ frameborder=”0″ width=”960″ height=”569″ allowfullscreen=”true” mozallowfullscreen=”true” webkitallowfullscreen=”true”></iframe>
  9. Go to File / Download to print slides as PDF or JPEG files.

Let’s brainstorm ways you can use Google Slides in your classroom:

  1. Rough draft of PPT then download Slides into PowerPoint for final editing/animations
  2. Every student create 1 slide for all class slide deck
  3. Embed slide deck on website for rotating presentation
  4. Images only slideshow
  5. Notecards for research
  6. Flashcards for vocabulary

GAFE Session Notes:

  1. Formative assessment – GDocs great for teachers to easily check in on student writing
  2. Long term paper – place all documents, research, images into a folder and have the student share the folder with the teacher
  3. Workflow – Decide on a naming convention for all assignments:  P3 Last First – Assignment Name
  4. Ipad vs desktop
  5. Use Chrome browser and Print directly to Google Drive – great for database articles because it saves a PDF of articles directly into drive & then students can move pdf into research folder.

Timeline JS – open source timeline tool

timelineBelow is an example of a timeline I made using Timeline JS. TimelineJS is an open-source tool that enables anyone to build visually, rich, interactive timelines. Beginners can create a timeline using nothing more than a Google spreadsheet.  For my sample, I created the images in Haiku Deck.  Then I exported them to PowerPoint so I could save each as a jpg.  Then I uploaded them to Flickr so I could get a specific URL for each image (I tried Google Drive but it didn’t give me an URL that ended in *.jpg).  This is a lot of steps so you might consider just using online images instead.  This is what my original Google spreadsheet looks like.

Step One:  Create your spreadsheet

Build a new Google Spreadsheet using their template. Drop dates, text and links to media into the appropriate columns.Note: Don’t change the column headers, don’t remove any columns, and don’t leave any blank rows in your spreadsheet.

Step Two:  Publish your spreadsheet

Under the File menu, select “Publish to the Web.”  In the next window, check “Automatically republish when changes are made.” Uncheck all other boxes. Click “start publishing.” This will give you the URL to embed in your HTML file.

Step Three:  Copy/paste spreadsheet URL into the generator box

Make sure you have published the spreadsheet first, then paste the URL at .  Feel free to customize then select PREVIEW.

Step Four:  Embed the code into your website

It will look like this when you are done or you can view it in a new browser:


Library of Congress is on Pinterest!

I am always trying to get my students to use primary source documents for their projects and have often sent them off to the Library of Congress website to browse their collections.

Did you know that the Library of Congress has a Pinterest page?  This page makes is SO EASY for students to browse the collections but still provides the source information.  Great job LOC!

Screen Shot 2015-04-06 at 11.17.17 AM


Creative iPad apps from Adobe

Adobe has released some great iPad apps and I have been creating samples to share with my faculty.

Adobe Voice

Voice is a free iPad app that helps you create stunning animated videos in minutes. No filming — just talk to tell your story. Pick from over 25,000 beautiful iconic images to show your ideas and Voice automatically adds cinematic motion and a soundtrack. Persuade, inform and inspire anyone online. Make an impact.

Check out:  My Voice sample project


Adobe Slate

Adobe Slate is a free iPad app that is the easiest, most fun way to turn any document – a customer newsletter, a book report or a travel adventure – into a beautiful visual story, in minutes. Simply tap on one of the professional themes and beautiful fonts, magazine-style design and motion automatically transform your story – guaranteeing a delightful read on any device.

Check out:  My Slate sample project  For some of the images, I used Canva, Haiku Deck, Phonto and Pic Collage.  Great for #appsmashing

The Ethics of Digital Manipulation



Ideas swimming around in my head after attending #NCCE2015



  1. Put in for funding to upgrade our version of Photoshop so students can design for the 3D printer
  2. Make another Infographic with Illustrator
  3. Purchase Sphero balls for Makerspace
  4. Plan out initial ideas for start-up incubator space
  5. Share Joe Dockery’s iPad Arts and Creation website with staff
  6. Investigate Intel K-12 Blueprint toolkit resources – especially Active Learning Spaces
  7. Participate in monthly #NCCE2015 Twitter chats
  8. Screencast some tutorials for Adobe Voice, Adobe Clip, Snapsneed, Trello
  9. Get a new stylus for sketchnotes!

NCCE 2015 Technology Educator of the Year

2015 NCCE Technology Educator of the YearAt the #NCCE2015 conference I was surprised and honored to be selected as the NCCE 2015 Technology Educator of the Year.  I have been attending or presenting at the NCCE conference for over 15 years and am thrilled to be part of this organization.  I have seen it grown over the years to know include hands-on workshops bringing in innovative speakers and educators.

I have to first thank the administration and colleagues at La Salle Catholic College Preparatory.  Ever since I received my Masters of Educational Technology from Pepperdine University, I have been seeking an educational environment that embraces technology and has a strong vision for student-centered learning.

La Salle Prep commits to a strong professional development for their faculty.  I love that our faculty works together to grow professionally.  We went 1:1 with iPads this year after three years of planning, collaborating, and working towards a common vision.  Faculty members share iPad best practices, collaborate on common assessments, focus on questioning strategies, and plan for literacy development throughout the curriculum.

I also want to thank my educational technology community.  My learning and teaching has been challenged by the experiences I have encountered throughout my career.

10415622_10203875812803171_2226749199090434807_nI accept this award and share it with all the educators I have met and worked with at:

And the various organizations that have shaped my teaching throughout my career:


Thanks also to Troxell Communications for sponsoring the award.



NCCE 2015 conference sessions

Next week I will be presenting at NCCE 2015 …


Wednesday 2hr workshop – Extend Learning using Online Discussion Forums

Extend learning by using online discussion forums with middle and high schools students.  Provide opportunities for your students to demonstrate their understanding of concept presented in class, have conversations with their peers, debate topics in a safe and respectful manner, and share resources using online discussion forums.  We’ll learn how to set up online discussion forums and compare features of Schoology and Edmodo (and others) to see how to give every child a voice in the classroom.  Bring your own device!



Thursday 1 hr session – Using Mobile Devices in the Research Process

How can teachers and Librarians using mobile devices to foster critical thinking during the research process of brainstorming, searching, evaluating, curating, organizing and presenting. We will discuss best practices and strategies and compile a list of useful apps or websites. 

Notes from presentation: 
Slide Deck:  
Padlet Wall:


Digital Learning Day



Digital Learning Day – Friday, March 13th – happened to fall during our school theme week this year.  With already a ton of extra scheduled events to explore social justice issues around water, I wanted to find a simple but fun way to celebrate Digital Learning Day.

Since we went 1:1 with iPads this year I thought an iPad Demo Slam might be a fun way to quickly share how students were using their iPads in class. We set up a projector in the main hallway and invited students to display their device and show off an app, a project or a creative way they are using their iPad.  We passed out treats to encourage a crowd and posted everyone’s ideas to a poster board.

Check out the following apps shared in the iPad Demo Slam:

  • Notes+ (similar to Notability but more powerful)
  • iStudiez free or Pro – student planner
  • Pythonista – program your own games on iPad
  • Canva – beautiful templates for posters, photo albums, social media
  • Songbook – organize your music
  • Let’s create pottery – virtual pottery creator
  • Akinator – Q&A fun game
  • Skitch – draw on your images
  • Art Rage ($$) – Art creations for the serious artist
  • iMotion – stop motion animation
  • Quizlet – make your own study cards
  • Tellagami – talking avatar
  • Anatomy 4D – augmented reality 4D versions of body & heart
  • Comic Life ($) – Create your own comics
  • Phonto – Add creative text to images
  • PiksArt – create art & photo editing
  • Wunderlist – organize your life & share calendars with friends or family
  • 1Password ($) stores all your passwords
  • Day One – daily journal


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