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Student-Centered Learning Experiences

Student-centered learning experience

I want my students to work collaboratively together on a project and get the benefits of common knowledge, process and critical thinking
  • Use collaborative Google Apps for Education tools (Drive, Docs, Slides, Sheets, Drawings) where every group member can work on the project at the same time
  • Use collaborative technology tools where multiple students can access:  Prezi, ThingLink, Padlet, EduBlogs, Wikispaces, LMS Digital Portfolio, Shared albums in Google Photos
  • Use online discussion forums (Edmodo, Canvas) to extend discussions beyond the class period
  • Host a backchannel chat during Socratic Seminar using Today’s Meet
  • Brainstorm ideas and post to digital bulletin boards (Padlet, Linoit, Dotstorming)
  • Hold asynchronous debates by recording opening arguments & rebuttals using video webcam
  • Use polling software (Socrative, Poll Everywhere, Google Forms) for surveys, opinions, voting, or polls. Collectively analyze data in Google Sheets and graph results
  • Use commenting on Google docs during the peer review process.
  • Use project management software (flow charts, brainstorm maps, graphic organizers, etc)
I want my students to have an authentic audience for their learning or to “do the real work of the discipline”
  • Have students blog and/or podcast about what they are learning in class for a real audience using EduBlogs or AudioBoom.
  • Find online collaborative projects with another class, global partners or other IB schools.
  • Bring in, record or Skype with experts in your field or host webinar using Google+ Hangouts.
  • Research real issues, participate in community projects then present solutions or steps to solve problems.
  • Design newspapers, presentations, PSA’s, a marketing plan or creative displays for organizations, business or outside groups
  • Submit writing to teen websites, publish books, eBooks or websites
  • Build 3-D models or simulations that others will use; Apply math concepts to real world problems
  • Participate in online challenges (EconChallenge, Global Math Challenge, Google Science Fair, etc.)
  • Collect real data & create graphs; analyze statistics or polling data & make inferences; present research to panel
  • Access Library of Congress source material, statistical data from Gov’t or NASA, explore research in electronic databases
I want to give students more ownership or choice in their learning and create a performance task instead of a traditional written paper or test.
  • Provide options for how students can demonstrate their understanding by offering a variety of performance tasks:  Video project, newscast, online simulations, research & role play, design, build & create, digital art projects, interactive posters, Infographics, multimedia presentations, digitally record a written narration, place-based content embedded on map, build a class website, drama
  • Have students “teach” classmates by making “Khan Academy” style videos, Create online how-to guides using SnapGuide.com, start a YouTube channel
  • Create time for “Genius Hour” or passion-based research projects; showcase projects at Learning Fair.
  • Allow for self-selected print reading material, eBooks or Audiobooks
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Digital Workflow Options

With all the equipment coming to our school in the coming month, teachers need to decide how they are going to push out digital information to their students.  Below are some options whether you want a complete digital solution for daily use — or use some ideas for occasional use.

Complete digital solutions:  Google Classroom, class website, Canvas LMS, Seesaw

Google Classroom (simple):

If you want the ability to post daily announcements and/or share assignments to your students, then set up a simple Google Classroom.  In Google Classroom, use the announcement feature to post the activity of the day or a reminder of the homework.  The announcements will appear in chronological order but not show up on the calendar because there are no due dates attached.  You also have the option to post an individual question to the class where students can respond to each other after their initial post.

Google Classroom (All Features):

If you want a online blended classroom with the ability to push out individual copies of Google documents, to students and have them turn them in digitally, then set up Google Classroom.  In addition to the announcement feature you create assignments in Classroom where you push out the assignment and it requires students to turn in the assignment digitally using Google Docs (See:  Understanding the Assignment Flow).

If you already have a classroom website (made with Google Sites, Weebly, Wix, etc) where you post assignments, and you want students to have copies of Google documents to work on but you don’t necessarily want them to turn in assignments digitally.  Open the document and select SHARE.  Create a “Shareable Link” but replace the end of the URL to /copy to force students to make a copy of the document for themselves.  Note:  It renames the document “Copy of TitleOfDocument” but the student can rename it if they choose.

Sample:  https://docs.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/document/d/12AglAM8EkKCsUjOuYqvieMLUlv6sES6h8ZFakeFPXnU/copy
Note:  Students could always “turn in” these type of documents with you by sharing the doc to your email address.  

If you want a complete digital solution for your class with digital handouts, multimedia options, online rubrics, annotations, etc then participate in the Canvas LMS pilot and talk to Colette or Terry if you want to participate in the Canvas pilot.  Please note:  the district LMS has NOT been chosen yet.

If you want students to have a digital portfolio where they upload copies of assignments, set up SeeSaw.  Seesaw empowers students to independently document what they are learning at school by creating a Seesaw Journal. Students can “show what they know” using photos, videos, drawings, text, PDFs, and links. Learn more …

 

Simple digital solutions:  shared folders, save to Drive, URLs, email, playlists

If you want a simple solution for sharing “view only” copies of documents or pdfs that are stored online then create a shared Google Folder.  Directions:  Access your Google Drive.  Go to New / Folder and name your folder.  Move the digital files that you want students to have access into the folder.  Right click on the folder and choose SHARE.  Choose “Get Shareable Link” and this will give you a long URL that students to can to access your share folder.  Hint:  Use a URL shortener* to make it easier for students.

If you want to “print” copies of database articles or websites and save them to Google Drive, then access your chosen database article or website but make sure you are logged into your GAFE account and use the Chrome browser — one of the printer options will now to “Save to Drive”.  This will create a pdf of the article that you can post in Classroom or put in a Shared Folder.

If you already have paper copies of a handout and want to convert it into a digital format then visit our school copiers and choose the SCAN feature.  “Copy” your documents with the scan feature and it will email a PDF of your handout to you when you provide your email address.

If you want a simple way to share long URLs with you students then Go to the Chrome web store and install the goo.gl URL shortener Chrome Extension to your browser.  Visit any website then select the icon on your toolbar and it will provide you with a short URL (and QR code!).  Another option is to use goo.gl or  bit.ly for custom URLs.

If you want the ability to send email to students in a class period  go to http://contacts.google.com and create a Group with all of your student’s email for each class period.  Send email from your GAFE email account for this to work.  Other options: Create Outlook group or use Synergy.

Vocabulary:

  • Digital workflow:  The process of providing (and possibly receiving) digital content to students who are using Chromebooks or iPads.
  • GAFE – Google Apps for Education (docs, drive, etc)  Teachers use first_lastname@beaverton.k12.or.us
  • Chrome Web App –  Applications you can run inside your browser with a dedicated user interface
  • Chrome Extension – Extend the functionality of Google Chrome and the websites being viewed in it.  More about Apps & Extensions…
  • URL shortener – A website that will take a really long web address (URL) and create a short URL that will redirect users to the correct link.  Two popular ones are: http://goo.gl  and http://bit.ly
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What Is A Chromebook?

ThingLink Project:  What is a Chromebook?  

 

Chromebook 101

  • Chromebook Benefits:
    • No hard drive, start up fast, work in constantly being saved, get another one, easily convertible from other platforms, touch screens
  • Chromebook Disadvantages:  
    • Limited software on the laptop, requires wifi,  must use Google suite, small screen, typing on a smaller keyboard
  • Features:
    • Everything is saved to Drive
    • Ability to use downloads for images & pdfs so you can transfer to flash drive.
    • Includes:  headphone jacks, built-in camera, USB, HDMI, and SD Media card slot 
    • Can drag Chrome apps to dock
    • If you sign into Chrome on your Mac, all your same apps & bookmarks stay the same
    • No printing from Chromebooks
  • Chromebook Distribution Options:
    • Numbered:  Accountability, placement
    • Any order:  quicker,  return plug out & up, leave them on the desk
    • Plug in at the end of the day
  • Chrome App Store  https://chrome.google.com/webstore/category/apps
    • Google apps:  Docs, Forms, Sheets, Slides, Drive, Classroom, YouTube, Translate, Search
    • Education: Padlet, Socrative, ThingLink, Haiku Deck, Desmos Graphing Calculator, Gale Databases
    • Creative:  Canva, Pic Monkey, Pixl Editor
 
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Student Engagement With Technology

This year the World History 9 Learning Team is investigating how technology can play a part in student engagement.  We are looking at the 5D indicators and trying to see how technology can enhance or impact the student’s experience when they are using Chromebooks in class.

Focus on Learning Targets

The first aspect to focus on the Learning Target.  Which targets contain language about discussion, understanding, providing evidence, making meaning, demonstrating knowledge, etc? Then we need to ask ourselves:  How could technology and/or student-engagement strategies impact the student learning in those targets?  Its essential that the teacher has a clear vision of what they hope to accomplish.

Choose Appropriate Technology

The next step is to choose the appropriate technology.  This can be challenging if you haven’t been exposed to what the various apps and software can do.  It can be helpful to observe teachers, view online examples or just try it out yourself.  Ask yourself:  Why choose that specific technology tool?  What does the technology tool provide that you cannot achieve without it?  The technology needs to make a difference – not just be a substitute digital solution.

World History 9 Example

To assist the World History 9 teachers in this process, I brainstormed a variety of technology tools and strategies and aligned them with the 5D Student Engagement guiding questions. For example:   SE1:  Intellectual Work:  Quality of questioning – Teacher frequently asks questions to probe and deepen students’ understanding or uncover misconceptions. Students question one another to probe for deeper thinking.

Ideas

  • Use Padlet or Google Form/Doc to generate parking lot of questions or research questions around a central theme or during a class discussion.
  • Using a Google Form, a polling app to assess student’s understanding of a concept learned in class – works great as an opener which can then lead to a discussion.  (Socrative, GoFormative, Get Kahoot).  Make sure to use a variety of questions – not just recall.  Use Google Form graphs to analyze the results.
  • Another idea:  Have students create polls as part of a student presentation to engage the audience and receive feedback of the classes’ understanding of their presentation.
  • Use Edmodo or LMS Discussion Forum using the Socratic Seminar methodology for an asynchronous discussion.  Intentionally teach how to respond for this type of discussion – consider grading the responses with a rubric.  For in class seminar, require students to have digital copies of evidence to share during seminar.  Use a Google Doc or Today’s Meet backchannel for sharing during seminar

There are many more ideas on our planning document.  Make a copy for your own use

 

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Google’s Chrome Browser vs. Chromebooks: Whats the difference?

A Chromebook is a different type of laptop. Instead of Windows or Mac OS, Chromebooks run Google’s Chrome OS. These machines are designed to be used primarily while connected to the Internet, with most applications and documents living in the cloud.

Google’s Chrome browser is a fast, simple, and secure web browser that you can use on any type of computer or laptop. Signing in to Chrome brings your bookmarks, history, and other settings to ALL your computers. It also automatically signs you into all your Google Apps for Education (GAFE) services.

What is the Chrome Web Store?  You can find apps, extensions, and browser themes for the Google Chrome browser in the Chrome Web Store. With these additions, you can do more with your Chrome browser or Chromebook.

  • These are a few of my favorite extensions:

    • goo.gl URL shortener — This is a Chrome extensions that installs a small icon next to your search bar.  Click on it and it will shorten any long URL into a short one and even provide you with a QR code for the link!

    • Tech Smith SnagIt – This Chrome extension will allow you to capture a section of your screen or even a video of your screen to save as an image or movie

  • Favorite Chrome apps to use with students that can be installed directly from the Chrome Web Store

    • Newsela – published news articles with various reading levels

    • Canva – Simple templates for graphic design

    • Haiku Deck – Simple but visually stunning presentation templates

    • Socrative – Formative assessments with quizzes, polls & exit tickets

So, if you use the Chrome browser on your laptop, save bookmarks, add extensions and apps – then when you log onto a Chromebook – your browser will look the same!  This makes it super easy for our students and staff to transition back and forth between devices.

 

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Great Features of Google Docs

With Google Docs, you can create and edit text documents right in your web browser—no special software is required. Even better, multiple people can work on the document at the same time and every change is saved automatically.  If you are new to Google Docs – check out the Google Docs Learning Center.

Helpful tips with Google Docs:

  1. Voice Typing:  This new feature allows you to talk into the Google Doc and it will type the text for you.  Go to Tools / Voice Typing and allow the use of the microphone.  I helped a dyslexic student complete their homework using Voice Typing and it was awesome.  More directions ?

  2. Research Panel:  The Research panel is a window that opens next to your Google Document and allows you to search Google for websites, images, word definitions, or quotes without leaving your document.  To open the Research Pane go to Tools / Research. The best part – it automatically creates a link on the page where they got their information. More directions ?

Want to learn more?  Every Wednesday morning join the “Breakfast Club” at 7:15 am in Colette’s office if you want 1:1 help with Google Docs or any tech situation.  Just drop by!

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One Drive To Rule Them All

As part of our Google Apps for Education (GAFE) account, the online version of Google Drive http://drive.google.com  is the ultimate cloud storage document sharing solution.  Think of Google Drive like a giant online file cabinet where you are able to upload and keep documents, photos, drawings, recordings, videos, PDFs — almost anything.  Sign in with your email address and then you can quickly invite others to view, download and collaborate on all the files you want — no email attachment needed.  And the best part – we get UNLIMITED STORAGE as part of our GAFE program!

Helpful tips:

  • Get organized! Organize your Drive folders the same way you do in My Documents.  You can then easily drag documents to Drive and use it as a backup system

  • Shared folders:  Right click on a folder and invite collaborators to make it a Shared Folder.  Whatever you place in the folder will automatically be shared with collaborators.  You can give them edit or view only rights.

  • Print to Drive: If you use the Chrome Browser you can “print” documents (save as) directly to Drive.  This saves paper and allows you to easily search for your online documents.


Want to learn more?  Every Wednesday morning join the “Breakfast Club” at 7:15 am in Colette’s office in the Media Center if you want 1:1 help with GAFE, databases, or any tech situation.  Just drop by!

 

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Science News magazine on EBSCO

Besides academic journals, EBSCO has some magazines in their results and I saw that Science News is one of them.

  1. First I went to the Sunset Library Resource page and chose Academic Search Complete https://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/depts/IT/Library-Resources/Pages/sunset.aspx
  2. You are automatically logged on when on campus; off campus needs your username and password.
  3. I chose Advanced Search but didn’t put anything in search (but you could) and just checked full text and wrote Science News for the publication and chose Search.
  4. This gives results from the magazine.  Then I changed the Relevance drop down menu to Date Newest and it displays all the Science News articles in reverse chronological order and most are PDFs from the magazine.
  5. You could also filter it by Cover Story if you only want more in depth stories.
  6. When you open the PDFs of each issue you can advance through the issue pages a few at a time and easily switch to a different issue.

Nifty tip:  If  you use a Chrome browser and are logged into your Google account you can “print” the articles directly to Google Drive – either the PDF or the HTML version.

Note:  Not all sources have original PDFs from the magazines – some are just the article text.  Some other science sources I found when searching (beside academic journals):  Popular Science, New Scientist, Science Now, Current Science, Scientific American, plus Time, US News & World Report, and Newsweek.

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Accessing Electronic Resources

FutureReady2

One of my #1 goals this year as a LITT is to expose faculty and students to the wide variety of electronic resources available through Beaverton School District.

Research shows that one area college-level students are lacking is in their ability to locate, access and disseminate scholarly material — especially from academic electronic databases.  

So if our goal is for Sunset students to be college and career ready our students need to know this information!

  1. Electronic Resources:  Access the Sunset Library catalog, electronic databases, eBooks, encyclopedias, etc from the Sunset Library Resource Page (hint:  bookmark it or access it from the Staff bookmark link!).  EBSCO Academic Search Complete is a new database to Beaverton this year!

  2. Handouts: Look over the two PDF handouts that were sent by email.

    1. One is a faculty handout which explains how to log in, search, share resource lists and passwords for various databases.

    2. Feel free to make copies of the student handout for your classes.  (This would be a great addition to the 9th grade notebook).  Pass this out to students but please don’t publish the password on a public website!

  3. Instruction: Invite me to a learning team meeting or to one of your classes and I will teach how to access the resources and give hints on how to conduct an effective search.

  4. Breakfast Club!  Want to meet 1:1 or with a few other to learn the basics of searching and access any of our electronic databases?  Let’s meet in Colette’s office Wednesday mornings at 7:15am for a refresher. Just drop by anytime :)

Cross posted at https://sites.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/sunsetpd/research

 

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What can a LITT do for you?

Every so often I will send out an email to my faculty with helpful tips and resources.  All information will be archived on my resource site:  https://sites.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/sunsetpd

9/8/15   What Can A LITT Do For You?
LITT stands for “Library Instructional Technology Teacher” and my role is to be an embedded resource at Sunset High School to help us move forward with the Future Ready initiative.  I am a certified School Librarian and technology evangelist!  I love to work with teachers in designing unit plans, locating print and digital resources for students to use and offering suggestion of how technology might engage students to impact and deepen their learning.  So what can a LITT do for you?  Here are a few ideas …
#SunsetReads

  1. Invite me to a Learning Team meeting — especially when you are planning out an instructional unit. I might be able to suggest electronic database resources or offer to help co-teach a technology lesson.
  2. I can locate and evaluate print and electronic resources to support your curriculum.  Give me a heads up and the Media Center staff can pull books onto a cart for you or I can peruse websites or our database collections and narrow down resources to match your curriculum.
  3. Struggling with a tech issues like building a Google Site or setting up a course in Canvas and you need someone to help you out?  Invite me to sit with you 1:1 and we will work on it together.
  4. Invite me into your classroom to promote the #SunsetReads program.  I can booktalk my favorite YA books, bring along interesting non-fiction titles to match your curriculum or take a #SunsetReads photo for the display.

Cross posted:  https://sites.google.com/a/beaverton.k12.or.us/sunsetpd/library 

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Colette’s Future Ready: News You Can Use

FutureReady2

I’ve been gathering some of my favorite resources for a new website that I am creating for my new position at Library Instructional Technology Teacher at Sunset High School.  Here’s my initial shares.

Chromebook

Google Apps for Education

  • Google Apps for Education – Training lessons and educator-created materials from Google.
  • Google Classroom resources from Alice Keeler – Math teacher and Google Classroom guru.
    • Alice posts great Classroom resources from her book:  50 Things To Do With Google Classroom and is a wealth of knowledge on all things Google Apps for Education.  Follow her on Twitter.
  • TimelineJS 3 from Knight Lab at Northwestern University uses a Google Spreadsheet to create an easy to make an interactive timeline with text, images, videos, sound files, etc.

Information Literacy

  • OSLIS for Secondary Teachers: OSLIS is the state funded Oregon School Library Information System that provides access to electronic databases for every Library in the the state.  This site also provides ideas for teaching research as well as an easy to use Citation Maker.
  • Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab).  The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material. Teachers and trainers may use this material for in-class and out-of-class instruction.

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Library

  • Oregon School Library Standards – A strong school library program includes instruction to support student achievement of standards in: Information Literacy, Reading Engagement, Social Responsibility and Technology Integration.
  • YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) Book and Media Awards and Lists for Libraries.

Subject Resources

Social Studies
  • Gapminder – Gapminder is a non-profit venture promoting sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals by increased use and understanding of statistics and other information about social, economic and environmental development at local, national and global levels.
  • The Racial Dot Map – This map is an American snapshot; it provides an accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country.
Video Editing
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100 Day Plan for a new job

The Prompt:  Before interviewing for my new position, I was asked to outline my 100 Day Plan for starting the school year as a new Library Instructional Technology Teacher. Planning my first 100 days gave me time to really reflect on the responsibilities of the new position and make concrete plans of how I would implement it.  I even searched “100 Day Plan” online and found examples from business and educational leaders.

30/60/90 day milestones: Below are my initial notes and now I am going through my calendar and intentionally scheduling reminders to meet with specific people, follow up on goals, checks for progress. etc.  I plan to check in with key stakeholders at 30/60/90 days and review goals and adjust as needed.

You don’t need to be starting a new job to put together a 100 plan.  The beginning of the school year is a great time to intentionally set goals and make adjustments.  What’s your 100 day plan?


 

For my 100 Day Plan I decided to focus on 4 areas:  Build Relationships, Information Literacy & Technology Curriculum, Professional Development and Promoting Literacy.

 

Build Relationships

  • Be visible, be positive and communicate :  eat lunch, hang out, attend department meetings, compliment teachers on success, get to know my Library Assistants, secretaries, IT, custodian
  • Meet with key stakeholders:  admin team, department chairs, student leaders, tech teachers, potential teachers for Technology Integration team, PTO.
    • As you reflect on this year, what has been the greatest success?  What has been the greatest challenge?
    • *What looks different in your classroom this year compared to last year?
    • *What skills/talents do you think you possess that you would feel comfortable sharing with other staff members?
    • *As we think about our journey over the past three years, what will take us from great to exceptional?  What next steps will help us continue to move forward?
  • Listen learn & observe:  Identify current/previous successes and challenges,   These conversations and a staff survey (before Day 50) will guide planning for next steps to ensure a culture of learning that is supportive of students, staff, and the community.
  • Lead with integrity and professionalism.  ‘EQ’, emotional intelligence, is more important than IQ when it comes to achieving success in the first 100 days

Information Literacy & Technology Curriculum

  • Gather information about current tech & library skill projects:  BSD Innovation Grant about information literacy & digital citizenship
  • Begin building a matrix that show these projects across grade levels & disciplines & track their goals, resources, time & outcomes.
  • Work with District Library & Technology  team on current implementation plans; providing a variety of current print and digital information resources to best match student inquiry needs.providing a variety of current print and digital information resources to best match student inquiry needs.
  • Align these projects with the Oregon State Library Standards & Common Core
    • Core: Information Literacy, Reading Engagement, Social Responsibility and Technology Integration  Because research literacy constitutes the backbone of the CCSS, students who master library standards can expect to experience greater success in reaching academic proficiencies.
      • Reading of complex text, attentive reading and reflective reading help students reach greater understanding & develop the stamina necessary for addressing complicated problems.
      • Learning to work in small groups, share information and evaluate a work for authenticity and clarity, help students to develop standards for improvement and achievement.
      • Learning to be an ethical user of written, digital and social content help students become responsible participants in a democratic society.
      • Learning to navigate and integrate a variety of technology leads to competence, confidence and creativity.
  • Talk with STUDENTS!
  • Seek out collaborators to provide digital resources for underserved populations/ diverse cultures or backgrounds or those who speak limited or no English.

Professional Development

  • Develop a core technology integration team that’s primary focus is to develop ideas of how technology can support curriculum and impact student learning
    • Use survey results to assess faculty needs:  “Needs Assessment”
    • Determine best manner of implementation:  informal or formal
    • Be intentional about developing a strong collaborative school culture:  Praise for innovation, risk taking, continuing development & effort.  Emphasize effectiveness, not popularity. Showcasing exemplars for grade-level expectations and progressions
    • Find collaborative teams that want to move forward in a specific area:  Teachers who use collaborative tech tools, teachers using a common assessment with backward planning, remedial tech skills, Multimedia projects (narrated speeches)
    • Use technology as a way of formative assessment, making thinking visible, differentiating instruction, performance assessments, evidence-based learning
    • Create a feedback loop channel & evaluation.  Are your needs being met? What other assistance can be offered?
    • Utilize Professional Learning Communities as Data Teams to monitor progress and respond to the effectiveness of instruction.   Is there strong evidence that it is directly related to improving student performance?
  • Use fun & creative technology for faculty meeting programs.  Example:  Use GetKahoot to review student policies, dress code, tardies, etc.
  • Tech Tip Tuesday style newsletter, website, dedicated hashtag – share & archive resources
  • Schedule dedicated informal tech:  Breakfast Club, Appy Hour, Tech Tuesdays. Invite staff and student volunteers to showcase their learning

Promote Literacy

  • Meet with current assistants and student book club to get input about how to promote literacy
  • Create the library to be an inviting space with creative book displays, shelf talkers, QR codes, book lists
  • Make connections with non-fiction literacy connected to Common Core subjects
  • Promote literacy programs:  Banned Books Week,  Teen Read Week, #SunsetReads:  involve staff in displaying what they are currently reading.
  • Participate in OASL Battle of the Books, voting for ORCA (Oregon Readers Choice Award) and other community based programs.

By 100 days — Be ready to begin long term School-wide Technology Integration Plan.

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A New Direction

DreamsQuoteI have this poster hanging in my office – I actually made alongside my Multimedia students a few years ago.  It reads Go confidently in the direction of your dreams – Live the life you have imagined” ~Thoreau.  

Well I never imagined that I would be announcing that I am leaving La Salle Catholic College Preparatory.

I have accepted a position with Beaverton School District at Sunset High School as their new Library Instructional Technology Teacher.  Sunset is one of 15 schools in the district designated as a “Future Ready School”.  The plan is to move towards a 1:1 environment and make sure all students are college and career ready.  Along with library assistants, I will work directly with faculty to help them use information literacy and technology to impact student learning.

My last five years at La Salle Prep have been some of the most rewarding of my professional career.  I have grown so much both personally and professionally working with the dedicated staff and want to thank La Salle Prep for their incredible support during this process.  

Sunset Principal John Huelskamp (formerly of de La Salle North) told me that a wise man named Tom Dudley (former La Salle Principal) once told him that you can be a Lasallian educator anywhere.  So I will proudly display “Let Us Remember …” on doorway of my office and think “… that we are in the presence of God” every time I walk through the halls of Sunset High School.

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ISTE 2015

 Unleash the Power of Your iPad with “App Smashing”

Come play and learn the power of App Smashing, the process of using multiple apps in conjunction with one another to complete a new and creative final task or project. We’ll put together fun combinations of apps to use with middle and high school formative assessments, presentations and student work.

  • Scheduled:
    • Wednesday, July 1, 1:15–2:15 pm EDT (Eastern Daylight Time)
    • Building/Room: PCC 126A

This sessions will showcase iPad apps but the concept of app smashing is open to any platform or device. Participants may choose ANY apps to smash. I recommend they install five different types of apps but are not limited to these suggestions: Photo Editing/Collage/Comic Strip apps (including one where you can add text, such as: Phonto, Pic Collage, Strip Designer, etc ) Screencasting / Presentation apps (Such as: Keynote, Haiku Deck, Prezi, EduCreations, Explain Everything, etc) Interactive / ePub creation apps (Such as: Thinglink, Book Creator, Snapguide, etc) Multimedia Apps (Such as iMovie, VoiceThread, Tellagami, etc)

Resources:

https://sites.google.com/site/colettecassinelli/appsmashing

 

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Google Apps training material

I often am asked to come to a school and provide a basic Google Apps for Education (GAFE) training during a faculty meeting.  Below is the sequence and activities that I use for a 2 hour training.  Feel free to use or adapt as needed.

Google Apps for Education (GAFE)  http://goo.gl/KbhjhE

Activity 1:  Getting Started with a Google Form

Lets collaborate on a project by using a Google Form to collect data for the Mystery Book project.  Purpose of this activity:  See how a Google Form can be used to easily collect data.

  • Find a partner:  One person can be the recorder & one person can be the researcher
  • Locate a fiction or nonfiction book that you want students to share for a specific subject area or grade level. Each person should recommend (at least) one book.
  • Fill out this Google Form with your collected data and image URL
  • Here is a link to our collected RESULTS (linked removed for privacy purposes).


Before we move on …

6 Ways to collect data using a Google Form

  1. Have students conduct experiment in classroom and one member goes to teacher’s computer to enter data for that group
  2. Have students create surveys using Google forms and display on own computer; students travel from machine to machine to fill out the survey
  3. Email the form to participants to collect data (can embed the form in the email); must know all members email addresses
  4. Email the form by using a distribution list from your contacts  (very easy if using Google Apps since all domain names are the same)
  5. Share the URL of the published form; consider using a URL shortener for easy access like:  http://goo.gl/, http://bit.ly/ or http://tinyurl.com/
  6. Embed the form in a Google Site, wiki, blog or website.

Let’s brainstorm ways you can use Google Forms in your classroom:

  1. Surveys
  2. Exit ticket
  3. Collect favorite books you read the last term
  4. Supply inventory
  5. Get to know you survey
  6. Science lab data collection
  7. Checking in on long term project
  8. Voting

Activity 2:  Researching with Google Docs

Now that we have collected some book titles, each participant will conduct some basic research about the book to prepare for the Mystery Book Project.

Each participant should open a COPY of the Mystery Book research project document.

Helpful Google Docs tip:  To easily share a document with others where you want them to have a COPY of the document (versus viewing or editing) is to edit the end of the URL like this:

Thing to try on the Google Doc:

  1. Go to Tools / Research and open the research pane on the side of the Google document.  Search for your book title and locate the author’s name.  The research pane keeps the search process as part of the document writing process.
  2. What happens if you click on the Preview / Insert Link / Cite buttons in the Research Pane?
  3. Answer some of the questions. Notice the options for text formatting:  fonts, style, line spacing, indent, color, bullets, etc.
  4. Select one of the questions:  Go to Insert / Comment to leave a comment about this question.  For example:  Not sure who would like this type of book?  Comments are great for giving feedback during peer/teacher review process.
  5. Look at the options for inserting images into Docs.  You can crop images, recolor, adjust brightness, add borders, etc.
  6. Check the Revision History:  Go to File / See Revision History.  This is especially helpful if you want to see who edited a document or revert back to an earlier version.
  7. Select the blue icon SHARE.  Share this document with your partner for editing purposes.
  8. Find the grey folder icon next to the document title.  Selecting this will allow you to move your document to a specific folder.

Helpful Google Drive tip:  Have every students create a folder in Drive for a specific units/subject.  Students SHARE the Drive folder with the teacher.  Every time a student places a document, spreadsheet or slide presentation in the folder it will automatically be shared with the teacher.

Let’s brainstorm ways you can use Google Documents in your classroom:

  1. Any and all rough draft writing
  2. Peer editing
  3. Collaborative notetaking
  4. Shared resource lists:  books, links, images
  5. Classroom newsletter – publish to the web and embed doc on website
  6. Monthly calendar (table)
  7. Posters – use image options (recolor, crop, borders)

Activity 3:  Shared Slide Presentation for Mystery Book Project

The power of any of the Google Apps for Education tools is collaboration. Participants will will collaborate together to create a simple Slide Presentation that can be used two ways:

  1. Print as posters with a QR code
  2. Embedded as a slide presentation in a website, blog or wiki

The purpose of the Mystery Book slide deck is to create promotional posters to entice readers to read a book — without telling them the author or book title.  Users will need to click on the link or scan the QR code to reveal the title.  Perfect for a book display!

Editing the Google Slide deck:

  1. The Slide Deck has already been made and the link allows anyone with the link to edit.
  2. Notice that I already created a simple design with colors and fonts.  Go to Slide / Edit Master.  I find that this saves time and students focus more on the activity than editing the slides.
  3. The editing of Slides is very similar to Docs.
  4. Slides has some basic transitions and animations – but not as much as PowerPoint.  Go to View / Animations to see the options.
  5. You can embed YouTube videos in Google Slide decks.
  6. Users can write in the speaker notes section and print the slide with notes, if desired.
  7. I created the QR code with a Chrome extension:  goo.gl URL shortener.  Users will need a QR code reader (i-nigma) to scan the code & view the website
  8. Embed slideshow:  Go to File / Publish to the Web and you can choose options:  slide size, auto advance, repeat and get the embed code. This code can be embedded on a Google Site, website, blog:  <iframe src=”https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/14dW7XfofgJXjIMqLFnnXoD-936kmKu3EaPnUwT9EkBU/embed?start=true&loop=true&delayms=3000″ frameborder=”0″ width=”960″ height=”569″ allowfullscreen=”true” mozallowfullscreen=”true” webkitallowfullscreen=”true”></iframe>
  9. Go to File / Download to print slides as PDF or JPEG files.

Let’s brainstorm ways you can use Google Slides in your classroom:

  1. Rough draft of PPT then download Slides into PowerPoint for final editing/animations
  2. Every student create 1 slide for all class slide deck
  3. Embed slide deck on website for rotating presentation
  4. Images only slideshow
  5. Notecards for research
  6. Flashcards for vocabulary

GAFE Session Notes:

  1. Formative assessment – GDocs great for teachers to easily check in on student writing
  2. Long term paper – place all documents, research, images into a folder and have the student share the folder with the teacher
  3. Workflow – Decide on a naming convention for all assignments:  P3 Last First – Assignment Name
  4. Ipad vs desktop https://sites.google.com/site/colettecassinelli/ipad
  5. Use Chrome browser and Print directly to Google Drive – great for database articles because it saves a PDF of articles directly into drive & then students can move pdf into research folder.
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